I have half a regular cabbage and half a red one. Instead of coleslaw, what can I make with them?

  • Posted by: Tasha
  • July 27, 2015
  • 1278 views
  • 7 Comments

7 Comments

sonya August 10, 2015
Here's some ideas; good luck!

Beer-Braised Cabbage
From Cook's Country | February/March 2009

Why this recipe works:

To pump up the flavors of the braising liquid in our Beer-Braised Cabbage, we chose a light-bodied lager. We also used beer-complementing ingredients like sautéed onion, mustard, vinegar, and thyme. To ensure the cabbage didn’t overcook from extended simmering, we simmered the braising liquid until slightly thickened before adding the cabbage.

Serves 4

You can substitute ¼ teaspoon of dried thyme for the fresh. This hearty side dish is a nice complement for pork.
Ingredients

2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 onion, chopped fine
1/2 cup beer, preferably light-bodied lager
1 tablespoon whole grain mustard (see note)
1/2 teaspoon minced fresh thyme
1 small head green cabbage (about 1 pound), halved, cored, and sliced thin
2 teaspoons cider vinegar
Salt and pepper

Instructions

Melt butter in large skillet over medium-high heat. Cook onion until softened, about 5 minutes. Stir in beer, mustard, and thyme and simmer until slightly thickened, about 2 minutes. Add cabbage and vinegar and cook covered, stirring occasionally, until wilted and tender, about 8 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Serve.

OR

Braised Cabbage with Parsley and Thyme (Cook's Illustrated)

Why this recipe works:

We set out to find the best cabbage recipe, one that would produce crisp-tender and flavorful cabbage. After blanching, steaming, and sautéing without success, we tried braising. This delivered a subtle mix of flavors, complemented by a slight residual crunch.

Serves 3

This dish is delicate and simple. For additional richness, increase the butter.

Ingredients

1 tablespoon unsalted butter
1 tablespoon low-sodium chicken broth
1 pound green cabbage (1/2 medium head), cut into 1/4-inch shreds (about 4 cups)
1/4 teaspoon fresh thyme (crushed)
1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley leaves
Table salt
Ground white pepper, (or black if white is unavailable)

Instructions

Heat butter in large skillet over medium heat. Add broth, then cabbage and thyme. Bring to simmer; cover and continue to simmer, stirring occasionally, until cabbage is wilted but still bright green, 7 to 9 minutes. Sprinkle with parsley and season to taste with salt and pepper.

OR

Cream-Braised Cabbage with Lemon and Shallots (Cook's Illustrated)

Serves 3 to 4

The French have been cooking cabbage in cream for ages. This is a variation on chou croquant, which means "crunchy cabbage."

Ingredients

1/4 cup heavy cream
1 teaspoon lemon juice from 1 small lemon
1 small shallot, minced
1 pound green cabbage (1/2 medium head), cut into 1/4-inch shreds (about 4 cups)
Salt and ground black pepper

Instructions

Heat cream, juice, and shallot in large skillet over medium heat. Add cabbage; toss to coat. Cover and simmer, stirring occasionally, until cabbage is wilted but still bright green, 7 to 9 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

OR

Braised Red Cabbage
From Cook's Country | December/January 2015

Why this recipe works:

This German American dish is all about balancing sweet and sour. In order to do so, we braise the cabbage in orange juice concentrate (to save time reducing orange juice), red wine, and brown sugar. Removing the lid partway through cooking allows the braising liquid to reduce to a thick, syrupy glaze. Finishing the dish with a tart Granny Smith apple, butter, and chopped parsley brings everything together.

Serves 4

We developed this recipe with inexpensive Cabernet Sauvignon, but any dry red wine will work. Our favorite frozen orange juice concentrate is Minute Maid Original Frozen Concentrated Orange Juice.
Ingredients

3 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 onion, halved and sliced thin
1 head red cabbage (2 pounds), cored and sliced 1/2 inch thick
1 cup red wine
1/2 cup frozen orange juice concentrate
1 1/2 tablespoons packed brown sugar
Salt and pepper
1 Granny Smith apple, peeled, cored, and cut into 1/4-inch pieces
3 tablespoons minced fresh parsley

Instructions

1. Melt 2 tablespoons butter in Dutch oven over medium heat. Add onion and cook until golden, 7 to 9 minutes. Stir in cabbage, wine, orange juice concentrate, sugar, 1 1/4 teaspoons salt, and 1/2 teaspoon pepper and bring to boil. Cover, reduce heat to low, and simmer for 45 minutes.

2. Stir in apple. Increase heat to medium-low and continue to simmer, uncovered, until cabbage is tender and liquid is syrupy, 25 to 30 minutes longer.

3. Off heat, stir in parsley and remaining 1 tablespoon butter. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve.

Hope you saw something that caught your fancy!
 
boulangere July 27, 2015
Lucky you! Here are some of my favorite ways to prepare it:
https://thesolitarycook.wordpress.com/2013/12/28/sesame-orange-braised-cabbage/
https://thesolitarycook.wordpress.com/2013/06/30/sandwich-saturday-the-santa-barbara-or-how-i-came-to-love-cabbage-part-1/
https://thesolitarycook.wordpress.com/2013/06/25/how-i-came-to-love-cabbage-part-2-braised-cabbage-and-rice-noodle-salad/
https://thesolitarycook.wordpress.com/2014/06/13/weeknight-dinner-seared-ahi-tuna-salad/
 
702551 July 27, 2015
I tend to prefer simple preparations so I'd just saute or stir fry them with some onions, maybe mushrooms. The end result freezes well, I just defrost and reheat (microwave) or add to something else (fried rice is a time-honored way to use up leftovers).

Another easy option is to make sauerkraut.
 
dinner A. July 27, 2015
This cabbage peanut salad calls for exactly that! http://lookimadethat.com/2011/05/27/cabbagepeanutsalad/
It's a favorite dinner for hot days for me. I like adding in some wok-fried tofu to make it more substantial, as well as some thin slices of cucumber.
 
Joe July 27, 2015
Can be added to salads or to fish tacos. If you like you can try to pickling them and using it to top salads or fish.
 
Nancy July 27, 2015
kasha varnishkes. a great frying pan dish of cabbage and buckwheat groats, usually also mixed with bow-tie pasta, mushrooms and onions. hearty, savory, scrumptious!
can be a side, or a main, topped with some leftover protein, a fried egg or the like. also good when garnished with sour cream or thick yogurt.
 
Tony S. July 27, 2015
Mario Batali does a "drunken cabbage" that is delicious. http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/mario-batali/drowned-cabbage-verza-affogata-recipe.html

 
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