🔕 🔔
Loading…

My Basket ()

All questions

Salted or Unsalted Butter

Growing up I recall we only had one choice for butter and that was salted. All my old cookbooks only state 'butter' to be used in recipes. Can I substitute unsalted and add more salt to the recipe?

BerryBaby is trusted source on General Cooking

asked almost 2 years ago

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

8 answers 689 views
F92231df 227e 4486 9cc8 279621ca1481  harvest party
added almost 2 years ago

Yes you can. The amount of additional salt to add would be miniscule.

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

84732cc2 b287 43eb 8c2c acb4fcea3d3f  2015 0917 cofield marble shape studs half moon mid bobbi lin 10925
added almost 2 years ago

That's often what I do! I'd say that most recipes now assume unsalted (and list a quantity of salt in the ingredient list). If it does list salt, you probably don't need to add more; if it doesn't, add to taste. (I just add a fat pinch.)

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

5f8d7fee 22ef 49ba a6b4 360299864c3e  n3ru8figt0zk0
pierino

pierino is a trusted source on General Cooking and Tough Love.

added almost 2 years ago

And using unsalted butter gives you more control over the total salt content as well as flavor of whatever you are making.

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
Maedl

Margie is a trusted home cook immersed in German foodways.

added almost 2 years ago

I always use sweet butter, no matter what the recipe specifies. Look for a sweet, cultured butter, which has an excellent flavor. Don't add more salt--it shouldn't make any difference in the recipe.

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

23d08e08 3b57 4e81 adcd 91701fc50809  fb avatar
added almost 2 years ago

I wouldn't worry about it, the recipe was most likely over salted to begin with. It used to have a bit less moisture than salted, but I don't think that's true anymore. Up until 15-20 years ago it was mostly a specialty item, and was generally kept frozen. I don't know if they changed it or just found that refrigeration was adequate, but it's quite common now; it's pretty much the default baking butter now.

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 2 years ago

salt is usually used as a preservative in butter so i only buy unsalted. i store the excess in the freezer until ready to use. i don't use a lot of salt in my cooking and like to control the amount, especially if i use something like pickles or olives or some such ingredient in cooking which would make the salt in butter redundant. i find that when we buy it by mistake, even a buttered piece of bread is strangely too salty. and really, i'm not anti salt.

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

4a133dad 72d1 43e3 84bb a8b5e6921f22  jesse avatar
added almost 2 years ago

Absolutely. I would go with the unsalted and not add more salt right away if salt can be added later. I always test for salt before plating. Only time I use salted butter is to accompany bread.

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

1097a5b5 1775 4eec a8ea 7421137b65dc  image 2 apples claire sullivan 2
amysarah

amysarah is a trusted home cook.

added almost 2 years ago

For me, unsalted butter has been the norm for decades - even as a kid, baseline butter was unsalted. Nowadays, I sometimes get really good salted butter for bread, but beyond that I generally assume unsalted for cooking, as Caroline said.

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)