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Sous Vide Storage

I'm seeing a lot of contradicting information regarding sous vide storage after cooking. Some says regardless of what I'm cooking and the temperature, I should dunk food into an ice bath to prevent bacteria from growing. Others say it's ok to remove it from the bag and put it in the fridge. If I'm cooking chicken breast at 149 for 1.5 hours, am I safe to remove it from the bag, put it in tupperware and leave it in the fridge so I can eat it for the next few days?

asked by Ryan F 5 months ago
3 answers 503 views
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Sam1148

Sam is a trusted home cook.

added 5 months ago

Why should the cooking method effect how you store a cooked product.
Just treat the cooked chicken breast like a cooked chicken breast. And actually..it's probably safer to keep sealed in the bag in the fridge rather than removing it and putting it in tupperware.
But for your first part...yeah..it's probably safer to chill it and then store it instead of a long rest to room temp.

But I think keeping it in the bag would be better than removing it, handling it and tupperwareing it for a chill in the fridge.

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Susan W

Susan W is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added 5 months ago

Keeping it sealed in the bag obviously won't allow you to eat it over the next few days, so of course it's okay to remove it and store it in another container.

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Lindsay-Jean Hard

Lindsay-Jean is a Contributing Writer & Editor at Food52.

added 5 months ago

For future reference, The Modernist Cuisine Team wrote in to say the following: "There is no harm in putting your food in an ice bath before refrigerating your chicken. If you cook your chicken to the FDA recommended time and temperature then you should be safe to remove it from the bag and put it in Tupperware to refrigerate."