recipe instructions unclear, or unknown


1. " Roll prociutto strips in chopped garlic and marjoram (on a plate). " How? Enclose?
2. "Lard" pot roast with prociutto rolls. ???? How? What does lard mean...grease? Doesn't the marj & garlic fall off when you lard? From italian recipe for pot roast.

inquiryworks
  • 813 views
  • 2 Comments

2 Comments

Lori T. January 18, 2021
"Larding" is a culinary technique used to add fat and moisture to an otherwise lean cut of meat. Usually it involves thin strips of pork fat, and in the really OLD way, uses a special larding needle to poke the fat strips in and pull them through the meat. I believe your recipe is aiming to do something similar, using prociutto to add flavor and fat. If it were me, I'd spread the chopped garlic and marjoram on the prociutto and then roll them up like little cigarettes. Since pretty much nobody has a proper larding needle anymore, I imagine that would be easiest done by using a thin bladed paring knife to stab a spot in the side of your roast, and then use your fingers to stuff one of the rolled up prociutto strips into the cut. You would repeat that in several spots evenly on your roast. It's a lot of work for a pot roast, honestly- but I bet it will taste good when you are done.
 
gandalf January 18, 2021
(1) Not knowing the full context of the recipe and ingredients, perhaps it refers to placing the chopped garlic and marjoram on a plate, then laying the prosciutto on top and rolling up the prosciutto so that it encloses the garlic and marjoram; or laying out the prosciutto and sprinkling the garlic and marjoram on top and then rolling it up.

(2) Although one meaning of "lard" is to grease something with lard (i.e., rendered pig fat), your direction is probably being used in the alternative meaning of adding to or enriching something for improvement or ornamentation. So I am guessing that the prosciutto rolls are placed around the pot roast during the cooking and/or serving process.

Are the above directions translated into English from an Italian source?
 
Recommended by Food52