🔕 🔔
Loading…

My Basket ()

All questions

if a ham is too salty how do you reduce that saltyness?

asked by whyo4 over 6 years ago

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

12 answers 93024 views
39bc764f 7859 45d4 9e95 fc5774280613  headshot 2.0 crop
Kristen Miglore

Kristen is the Creative Director of Food52

added over 6 years ago

The easiest thing would be to just use less of it, surrounded by less salty ingredients. Slice it thinly in a sandwich with lots of fresh vegetables, like avocados, lettuce, tomatoes. Or chop it into small chunks in an under-salted quiche or omelette.

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 2 years ago

if the days of the way-too-salty ham are over, then why are they still being sold in stores? they are only consumed by those who cannot afford better, and want something special for their holiday table. oh... ya, right.... far too many of us are improverished.

surround it with less salty ingredients, some say? of course, we do. but it does not help the overbearing saltiness of the blessed ham (or turkey, chicken, etc)
so perhaps some of you need to get off your soapboxes and look at the problems of real people, trying to feed real families, as heathily as possible. (the poor need help getting healthy food, too)

i am certain that pork and poultry producers might say differently

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added over 6 years ago

What type of ham is it? Here in the South, we have access to lovely country ham which is very salty. It's soaked in water for about 2 days, then baked. We then slice it very, very thinly to serve. Ham will be salty generally, because that's what makes it ham;)

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

9b94e94b 0205 4f2c bb79 1845dcd6f7d6  uruguay2010 61
added over 6 years ago

One of the reasons so many pumped (made with water) hams are soooo sweet, is to hide the saltiness and sodium phosphate (which gives you a soapy taste). I find it very hard to find a properly made ham anymore. I am guessing you probably have a pumped ham, so there is not much that can be done but yell very loudly at the manufacture of the ham. If they reduce the salt and sweetness, you would get a ham that tastes so much better. The days of high amounts of salt used in processed meats is over!

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

0f493ab9 068f 4498 ba2c 95c992214d52  sit2
Sam1148

Sam is a trusted home cook.

added over 6 years ago

Make a glaze. My basic one for sliced ham fried in a pan is a table spoon of Honey, a touch of allspice, 1/8 tsp of cinnamon, and 1/8 tsp cloves (ground in a mortar or smashed in wax paper with a rolling pin). A shot of orange juice or pineapple juice. Cook the ham until starting to brown....add the juice to deglaze..add the spices. Return the ham to the pan and reduce.

You could also chop it and use it in a fried rice, with onions, bell peppers, a bit of hoisin sauce, and cubed pineapples.

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

Fff96a46 7810 4f5c a452 83604ac1e363  dsc03010
added over 6 years ago

By "ham," I will assume you mean one of those red-brown shanks or butts on a bone, not pieces of pink pork that are pressed together and cured in an airtight oval container.

You can de-brine a ham by soaking it in water, sugar water, Coca Cola, apple juice or any other liquid that isn't salty. The most difficult part is finding a container deep enough to hold the entire ham underwater; if you don't own a deep stock pot, use a Dutch oven or a kitchen sink (which is scrupulously clean, of course) and turn the ham every half hour or so.

Two to four hours in tepid water is usually enough time to draw out enough salt to make it more palatable to you. Longer than four hours is okay, but I'd probably put it in the refrigerator then.

De-salinating doesn't affect the taste or texture of the ham--it just leeches out some of the salt. To give a bigger impression of less salt, pour something sweet over the ham, such as the sauce suggested by Sam1148.

(I don't glaze my hams because I can't stand the taste of cloves or brown sugar in bean or split pea soup made from the leftover ham. I make a glaze or sauce and serve it in a gravy boat on the side.)

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added over 6 years ago

if you have leftover ham that's too salty, milk, cheese or milk products (sour cream, cottage cheese etc) will counteract the saltiness. also potato is a good addition to a dish that's been over salted (soups, stew etc). Or combine both & make scalloped potatoes & ham.

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 2 years ago

"if the days of the way-too-salty ham are over, then why are they still being sold in stores? they are only consumed by those who cannot afford better, and want something special for their holiday table. oh... ya, right.... far too many of us are improverished.

surround it with less salty ingredients, some say? of course, we do. but it does not help the overbearing saltiness of the blessed ham (or turkey, chicken, etc)
so perhaps some of you need to get off your soapboxes and look at the problems of real people, trying to feed real families, as heathily as possible. (the poor need help getting healthy food, too)

i am certain that pork and poultry producers might say differently" Ghostfox rather an inconsequential and unnecessary rant.
As a British Corbinister waste is the greater evil, so anyone that helps to salvage food is fine in my book.
We have a regional bacon over here that is a Welsh cure, very salty and fatty. I cannot stand it , the Welsh love it.
By the way my wife and I amongst other things donate our time over christmas to cooking in homeless shelters, my kid bother does the same in a Psychiatric hospital, and you?

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added 7 months ago

Oh, wow. I came here because I bought a bone-in ham to make soup and it is much too salty to eat, and would ruin the soup. I completely understand where ghostfox is coming from. The ham was half price so I was able to come up with a $40 grocery bill to feed my family for a week with hot ham dinner, ham sandwiches, ham omelettes, and split pea soup. Having a salty ham is not just an inconvenience for me. That's my grocery money for the week. Last night when I could not serve the ham for dinner I made the kids fried eggs instead. Then I soaked the ham overnight and now I am looking for rescues that don't involve masking the salt with sugar, which just compounds the nutritional problems. Some say soak in cold water, some say boil, some have said add vinegar, some say add milk ... I was looking for an answer. But clearly I am looking in the wrong place.

Congratulations Max on your work in homeless shelters. The poor are not just poor at Christmas, we eat all year round. And the working poor aren't looking for your charity at shelters. We are working things out as best we can every day battling a food industry that is designed to addict our kids to salt and sugar.

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added 7 months ago

If the ham was for soup I would suggest using less ham in the soup or increasing your stock (unsalted) to dilute it. I have made soups with ham that were too salty and just kept adding liquid to dilute and have had success with that. Also, I would soak the ham in cold water for some hours and then throw it out. If you boil it you will make it dryer and tougher. You could try making it with some pasta, peas and a little white sauce, or dollop of sour cream, and if you serve it as the meat i would add some currant / cranberry jelly to add some moisture and an additional flavor. Quiche, frittata and scrambled eggs into tortillas are also good and tasty ways to enjoy it in smaller portions. And if all else fails cut it into smaller chunks and freeze them to pull out and add to soups. And please ignore the the less than helpful comments - this is a great community and you will get good advice here.....just sometimes the gremlins visit.

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added 7 months ago

This is the worst group of answers to a question I have ever seen!!! Use less ham? Use less salty side dishes? Add milk products? Make a glaze? Okay...for those of you that like these ridiculous answers, please excuse yourselves. I am a cook. Trained. I wanted to know how others handled the fact that the ham I bought was absolutely inedible because of the saltiness. I thought maybe soaking the ham in milk or water or a no sodium broth might help. When I found this website, I was amazed at the lack of practicality. The woman who needed to feed her family for a week on the ham she bought didn't need to read about a glaze for Pete's sake! Please list practical solutions instead of promoting your recipes.

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

8c092df4 e747 4936 aa6a 76429bec1edd  fb avatar
added 6 months ago

For those of us on restricted salt intake and are in the mood to "cheat" a little, I would suggest boiling the portion you would like to eat for a snack or a meal. This lowers the salt content by 2/3. Still not super healthy, but will lower the mortality rate significantly. I would not attempt to do the full ham all at once. To reduce the maximum amount of salt, do it one portion at a time. It will be very noticeably less salty and less fatty. (Two birds with one stone!)

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

Loading…

Reset
Password

  Enter your email below and we'll send you instructions on how to reset your password

Account Created

Welcome!

Logged In

Enjoy!

Email Sent

Please check your email for instructions
on how to reset your password

Successfully logged out

Let's Keep in Touch!

Get the recipes and features that have us talking, plus first dibs on events and limited-batch products.

(Oh, and $10 off your order of $50 or more in the Food52 Shop, too.)

Please enter a valid email address.