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All questions

Making a simple syrup, how long can it be stored for and what is the best type of container to store it in??

asked by zoosavagew1 almost 7 years ago

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18 answers 124741 views
ChefJune
ChefJune

June is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added almost 7 years ago

I almost always prefer to store things in glass containers rather than plastic, especially for extended periods, so I'd advise a glass jar.

Simple syrup is basically sugar and water. It should keep indefinitely in a covered container in the fridge.

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a Whole Foods Market Customer
added almost 7 years ago

Hmmm...as the name says, it's very simple to make, so why store it at all? Just make what you need when you need it--just one to one on the sugar to water. If you want to make extra and store it, I would store it as long as I would store, say, Kool-Aid, or lemonade.

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boulangere
boulangere

Cynthia is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added almost 7 years ago

If you add the juice of half a lemon, you'll extend the shelf life. You can probably hold it for a couple of weeks.

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Alex Orr
added 11 months ago

But then you're making a flavored simple syrup. This could drastically change anything you normally use plain simple syrup in, for example, it would totally throw off the flavors of an Old Fashioned or a daiquiri.

Hilarybee
added almost 7 years ago

I try not to keep mine for more than two weeks. Even in a closed, glass container simple syrup starts to take on smells and other funky tastes.

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Greenstuff
Greenstuff

Chris is a trusted source on General Cooking

added almost 7 years ago

This same question got a lot of attention not too long ago. Check out
http://www.food52.com/foodpickle...

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OaklandEater
added almost 7 years ago

Simple sugar is not worth storing. It's one to one water and sugar. By the time the water is boiling, the sugar is essentially melted so just make was you want and use any leftover for anything lying around. Throw it in orange juice or a jar of jam or on a salad or in a recipe for something that calls for liquid. Also, if you don't make quite enough, just add a little more water. Who's going to know?

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Exbruxelles
added about 1 year ago

It's true that simple syrup is really easy to make, but I keep some in the refrigerator for cocktails since it takes as long--or longer-- to cool than it does to make.

the professor
added almost 7 years ago

i recently made a batched infused with a bunch of mint (mint juleps, anyone?), and used a leftover plastic bottle (which had previously held poland springs water). kept for two weeks, and i only threw it out b/c the mint was browning. this is the budget option if you don't have glass jars hanging around!

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the professor
added almost 7 years ago

i recently made a batched infused with a bunch of mint (mint juleps, anyone?), and used a leftover plastic bottle (which had previously held poland springs water). kept for two weeks, and i only threw it out b/c the mint was browning. this is the budget option if you don't have glass jars hanging around!

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the professor
added almost 7 years ago

i recently made a batched infused with a bunch of mint (mint juleps, anyone?), and used a leftover plastic bottle (which had previously held poland springs water). kept for two weeks, and i only threw it out b/c the mint was browning. this is the budget option if you don't have glass jars hanging around!

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Christi Rice Miro
added over 3 years ago

Sugar water doesn't spoil but your container could get bacteria in it if not properly handled. I kept mine for about several months when I had gestational diabetes. My husband and I use it for our ice coffee in the mornings. Who has time to stand there boiling water when you're getting breakfast for your family and out the door??
This website says 6 months:
http://cocktails.about...

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SeaJambon
added over 3 years ago

One issue with SS -- if your container isn't super clean (and even if you think it is!), the SS can crystalize, quickly making it unusable (but a delightful science experiment - rock candy anyone?!). A little acid (lemon like Boulangere suggests or cream of tartar) can help prevent this problem.

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Jeanne
added about 1 year ago

I know this is an old thread, but -pastry chef here, with some suggestions. Adding cream of tartar, citric acid or lemon juice will help prevent crystalization and extend the shelf life of your ss. They WILL, however, change the pH and therefore, the color and flavor of many syrups. Boiling longer may also retard crystalization, as will adding glucose or corn syrup in place of some of the sugar. There ate great reference charts all over the Internet on how to sub and how much of the other inhibitors mentioned here to add. It is essential simple syrup be kept cold to inhibit bacteria and mold growth, but even cold, these things will eventually grow in the liquid. Simple syrups can be frozen indefinitely. They will not freeze solid, especially the heavy syrups, which have a higher sugar to water ratio. They'll just become extremely viscous, but leaving them to come to room temp before using will loosen them up. (Use a 1/4 t. of liquid citric acid to every T of lemon juice a recipe or formula calls for. )

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spiffypaws
added about 1 year ago

14 days is the max. I agree with another commentator; it is so easy to make, just make what you need.

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spiffypaws
added about 1 year ago

any container that is airtight is sufficient

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Nancy
Nancy

Nancy is a trusted home cook.

added about 1 year ago

Here's one bartender site that suggests one month for 1:1 (sugar to water) and six months for 2:1 syrup, refrigerated, in a sterile container (doesn't specify material).
http://www.foodrepublic...
That's for simple syrup with no additional flavoring agents.

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Alex Orr
added 11 months ago

I've been making 1:1 simple syrup for my home bar for over a decade. I usually make about two cups worth and put it in a squirt bottle. I keep it in my fridge for between 1-3 months. I've done this with at least 50 batches. Never had any grow mold, lose flavor, make me sick, acquire off flavors or or aromas, etc...

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