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A question about a recipe: Baked Ricotta and Goat Cheese with Candied Tomatoes Okay, this may seem like an odd question indeed.

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But if you wanted to adapt this recipe, because you knew that some of your guests did not care for goat cheese at all, what cheese would you use instead? Thank you so much. ;o)

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

asked about 7 years ago

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5 answers 2366 views
hardlikearmour
hardlikearmour

hardlikearmour is a trusted home cook.

added about 7 years ago

How about a non-goat milk fromage blanc? Would be similar in texture and flavor to fresh goat cheese. I'd also think about an aged Manchego (Viejo) or a sharp cheddar. Something with a fairly strong and sharpish flavor seems like it would be a good alternative.

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SKK
SKK
added about 7 years ago

My sister can't stand goat cheese - it literally makes her gag. I use feta, sour cream or even boursin at times.

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wssmom
added about 7 years ago

I am with SKK; I'd use boursin!

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drbabs
drbabs

Barbara is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added about 7 years ago

I'm planning to make this also and my husband also hates goat cheese (and feta, boursin, etc.) so I was thinking of using all ricotta and upping the herbs--maybe a mixture of basil and oregano in addition to the marjoram--and adding lemon or lime zest and possibly some garlic.

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Droplet
added about 7 years ago

Goat cheese also comes in various forms, both soft and hard. The recipe isn't very specific, but I am sure you can substitute cow's cheese successfully ( in terms of texture, with an expected palatable variation in taste to those who know their cheese). I have tasted a great variety of Feta cheeses and even they vary considerably in their own family. And since this is a composite bake, I think a substitution will be forgiving. If it is the tang that bothers you, it might be a bit more of a problem here since the candied tomatoes contrast it, but you can try to ofset it with a bit of honey in the bake itself. Or if it is the smell, I suppose you can use a bouquet of other herbs along with the marjoram...Letting a block of feta rest in clean water for several hours or overnight mellows the taste quite a bit. Hope this helps.

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