🔕 🔔
Loading…

My Basket ()

All questions

Farro

asked by a Whole Foods Market Customer almost 6 years ago

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

5 answers 875 views
Ece90812 0903 49a8 8e35 aa86c774be22  dsc00202
francesca gilberti

Francesca is the former Assistant Editor of food52 and believes you can make anything out of farro.

added almost 6 years ago

My favorite grain! Just kidding -- in all seriousness, farro (yes, two "r"'s) is an ancient roman grain, similar to barley and spelt, but NOT the same. In Italy, it is often cooked like pasta (in boiling water for about 15 minutes or so -- till al dente) or risotto (using water to gradually thicken and cook through.) It's nutty flavor and pleasant toothiness makes it perfect in salads (warm and cold), soups, and ground into flour for cakes and such. I could go on ... but that should get you started. Enjoy!

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

Ece90812 0903 49a8 8e35 aa86c774be22  dsc00202
francesca gilberti

Francesca is the former Assistant Editor of food52 and believes you can make anything out of farro.

added almost 6 years ago

My favorite grain! Just kidding -- in all seriousness, farro (yes, two "r"'s) is an ancient roman grain, similar to barley and spelt, but NOT the same. In Italy, it is often cooked like pasta (in boiling water for about 15 minutes or so -- till al dente) or risotto (using water to gradually thicken and cook through.) It's nutty flavor and pleasant toothiness makes it perfect in salads (warm and cold), soups, and ground into flour for cakes and such. I could go on ... but that should get you started. Enjoy!

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

Ece90812 0903 49a8 8e35 aa86c774be22  dsc00202
francesca gilberti

Francesca is the former Assistant Editor of food52 and believes you can make anything out of farro.

added almost 6 years ago

My favorite grain! Just kidding -- in all seriousness, farro (yes, two "r"'s) is an ancient roman grain, similar to barley and spelt, but NOT the same. In Italy, it is often cooked like pasta (in boiling water for about 15 minutes or so -- till al dente) or risotto (using water to gradually thicken and cook through.) It's nutty flavor and pleasant toothiness makes it perfect in salads (warm and cold), soups, and ground into flour for cakes and such. I could go on ... but that should get you started. Enjoy!

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

Ece90812 0903 49a8 8e35 aa86c774be22  dsc00202
francesca gilberti

Francesca is the former Assistant Editor of food52 and believes you can make anything out of farro.

added almost 6 years ago

My favorite grain! Just kidding -- in all seriousness, farro (yes, two "r"'s) is an ancient roman grain, similar to barley and spelt, but NOT the same. In Italy, it is often cooked like pasta (in boiling water for about 15 minutes or so -- till al dente) or risotto (using water to gradually thicken and cook through.) It's nutty flavor and pleasant toothiness makes it perfect in salads (warm and cold), soups, and ground into flour for cakes and such. I could go on ... but that should get you started. Enjoy!

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

Ece90812 0903 49a8 8e35 aa86c774be22  dsc00202
francesca gilberti

Francesca is the former Assistant Editor of food52 and believes you can make anything out of farro.

added almost 6 years ago

My favorite grain! Just kidding -- in all seriousness, farro (yes, two "r"'s) is an ancient roman grain, similar to barley and spelt, but NOT the same. In Italy, it is often cooked like pasta (in boiling water for about 15 minutes or so -- till al dente) or risotto (using water to gradually thicken and cook through.) It's nutty flavor and pleasant toothiness makes it perfect in salads (warm and cold), soups, and ground into flour for cakes and such. I could go on ... but that should get you started. Enjoy!

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

Loading…

Reset
Password

  Enter your email below and we'll send you instructions on how to reset your password

Account Created

Welcome!

Logged In

Enjoy!

Email Sent

Please check your email for instructions
on how to reset your password

Successfully logged out

Let's Keep in Touch!

Get the recipes and features that have us talking, plus first dibs on events and limited-batch products.

(Oh, and $10 off your order of $50 or more in the Food52 Shop, too.)

Please enter a valid email address.