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I have a recipe and there's a suggestion that it be served with "prepared English mustard". Rookie question: what is that? Can I use it to do other things than accompany this dish (it's a very yum Guinness/steak/chedder pie, but I don't make it that often)?

asked by mklug almost 7 years ago

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8 answers 1190 views
23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 7 years ago

Coleman's English Mustard, my hubby's favorite. Comes in a small, yellow glass jar. We always have to have it with sausages. I actually like Chinese mustard better, but that's just me.

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23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 7 years ago

It is strong mustard and you can use it like any mustard, on sandwiches, in recipes....

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23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 7 years ago

opps I though img src tag worked here.

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23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 7 years ago

Prepared just means it's not ground mustard powder. I think you'd be safe using whichever prepared mustard you most prefer.

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79ca7fa3 11e3 4829 beae d200649eab49  walken the walk
pierino

pierino is a trusted source on General Cooking and Tough Love.

added almost 7 years ago

Please don't worry about the "English" part. They don't understand mustard anyway---although they do make good worcestershire sauce. Substitute your favorite french mustard (ha, take that William Pitt!). Just don't use something like French's yellow.

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23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 7 years ago

Now, now. I disagree with pierino. French mustard is good, but an English mustard is a bit different. It tends to be on the sharp/hot side and I find that with something like a steak pie its assertiveness makes for a better match.

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23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 7 years ago

I think prepared English mustard means Coleman's Mustard powder mixed with water to "prepare" it. In our house we eat it as a condiment - very sparingly - with steak. I always make it at least 30 minutes before we eat it to let it cure.

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23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 7 years ago

Thanks all--I like the sound of it, and think it'll be just the thing to cut through the yummy-yet-heavy nature of the steak pie. Plus, I found a few good-looking recipes that call for just the mustard powder (unprepared, I guess) as part of a rub. Am very excited...thanks again!

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