Chicken

Mom's Curried Chicken Pancakes

April 12, 2012
Author Notes

My mom was a terrific cook . Raised as a sheltered Southern small town girl , once she left home and adapted to the life of a peripatetic Naval officer's wife, she embraced the world of International cooking with a passion. One of her (and our) favorite buffet dinners was a kind of American curried chicken Rijsttafel (popular at the time), where a creamed chicken curry over rice was topped with your choice of many condiments . She also used to make curry chicken pancakes for hors d'oeuvre, but they were rather simple compared to the many flavored buffet dish. In these pancakes, I have combined the two dishes to make moist and creamy entree pancakes filled with curried chicken,
cooked grains, toasted coconut , crunchy onion rings, raisins and green pepper. They would be equally at home as hors d'oeuvre but we enjoy having them for dinner, as a delightful and memory-filled excuse to use up leftover chicken and grains.
LE BEC FIN

  • Makes about 50 2" pancakes
Ingredients
  • 1/2 cup spelt flour or 'white whole wheat' flour
  • 1/2 cup white AP flour or 'white whole wheat' flour
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/4 cup Madras curry powder (Sun brand is excellent)
  • 2 teaspoons ground toasted cumin
  • 2 tablespoons ground toasted coriander
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 1/2 cups plain yoghurt
  • 2 tablespoons melted unsalted butter
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 2 teaspoons finely grated ginger
  • 1/4 cup Major Grey's chutney**
  • 2 cups cooked chicken, shredded and chopped
  • 1 1/2 cups cooked short grain brown rice or cooked Trader Joe's Multigrain mix*
  • 1/2 cup heated canned onion rings, lightly chopped
  • 1 cup toasted sweetened coconut, lightly crushed
  • 1/2 cup raisins, plumped in boiling water and drained
  • 1/2 cup minced sweet green pepper
  • optional 1 cup cooked lentils
  • unsalted butter for cooking and service
In This Recipe
Directions
  1. Sift together flour through baking powder.Add curry powder,cumin and coriander. In another bowl, whisk together egg through lemon juice; add ginger and chutney.Briefly combine contents of dry and wet bowls.Add chicken through green pepper. Stir til well combined but do not overstir.
  2. In a hot buttered skillet, cook 2" pancakes over medium high heat for a few minutes til bottom is browned and bubbles appear on the batter surface. Flip and finish cooking 5+ minutes til browned and firm.
  3. Arrange on a heat proof tray.Top pancakes with soft butter, and a dab of Major Grey's chutney.
  4. Note: * If you are using up leftover rice, sprinkle some water on it and microwave briefly to soften. Let cool a bit before adding to batter. **Cross and Blackwell's Major Grey's Chutney is available in most supermarkets.

See Reviews

See what other Food52ers are saying.

  • arielleclementine
    arielleclementine
  • BoulderGalinTokyo
    BoulderGalinTokyo
  • LE BEC FIN
    LE BEC FIN
Review
I am always on the lookout for innovative recipes, which is why I am just ga-ga over my recently- discovered Food52 with its amazingly innovative and talented contributors. My particular eating passions are Japanese, Indian, Mexican; with Italian and French following close behind. Turkish/Arabic/Mediterranean cuisines are my latest culinary fascination. My desert island ABCs are actually 4 Cs: citrus, cumin, cilantro, and cardamom. I am also finally indulging in learning about food history; it gives me no end of delight to learn how and when globe artichokes came to the U.S., and how and when Jerusalem artichokes went from North America to Europe. And that the Americas enabled other cuisines to become glorious. I mean where would those countries be without: Corn, Tomatoes, Chiles,Peanuts, Dried Beans, Pecans, Jerusalem Artichokes??! While I am an omnivore, I am, perhaps more than anything, fascinated by the the world of carbohydrates, particularly the innovative diversity of uses for beans, lentils and grains in South Indian and other cuisines. Baking gives me much pleasure, and of all the things I wish would change in American food, it is that we would develop an appreciation for sweet foods that are not cloyingly sweet, and that contain more multigrains. (Wouldn't it be fantastic to have a country of great bakeries instead of the drek that we have in the U.S.?!) I am so excited by the level of sophistication that I see on Food52 and hope to contribute recipes that will inspire you like yours do me. I would like to ask a favor of all who do try a recipe of mine > Would you plse write me and tell me truthfully how it worked for you and/or how you think it would be better? I know many times we feel that we don't want to hurt someone's feelings, but. i really do want your honest feedback because it can only help me improve the recipe.Thanks so much.