Avocado

Santa Fe Sushi Spirals with Crab, Black Bean and Avocado

June 19, 2012
Author Notes

Do you love the look of Japanese maki but aren't drawn to raw fish?And are you a fan of Southwest flavors and color? Well, these might be for you! The orange of a chile flour tortilla replaces the nori wrapper; the rice filling is replaced by black bean puree, and the crab and avocado provide a colorful center.They are great fun to make and eat .Kids love to get involved because they come together quickly and the possible variations are endless.(Uh oh, PB&J maki?!) These spirals were inspired by John Rivera Sedlar's "Modern Southwest Cuisine".

I have provided a dipping sauce but I prefer the flavor of the rolls unadorned. Their refrigerated shelf life is about 5 days, and because the black bean puree is not wet, they will not get soggy.
. —LE BEC FIN

  • Makes 6-8 sushi spirals
Ingredients
  • Tortilla Spirals
  • 1 large red chile flour tortilla
  • 2/3 cup Black Bean Puree*
  • 1/4 one Scallion green, quartered lengthwise
  • 2 pieces Imitation Crab sticks**(Kanikama)
  • 3 slices Ripe Haas Avocado, sliced 1/3" thick lengthwise***
  • Chipotle Sour Cream
  • 3/4 Sour cream (no liquid)
  • 1/4 Plain Yoghurt (not 'No Fat')
  • 2+ teaspoons pureed Chipotles in Adobo (without seeds;San Marcos brand recommended, not La Morena which needs seeding -ugh)
  • 2 teaspoons Orange Juice concentrate
  • 1/4- 1/2 teaspoon minced garlic
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice
  • pinch of kosher salt
In This Recipe
Directions
  1. Tortilla Spirals
  2. Place chile tortilla on board and spread with thin even layer of black bean puree. 2 " up from the bottom of the tortilla, place two pieces of crabstick, end to end, in a horizontal band. Place scallion slice on one side of crab, and avocado slices (end to end, straightened out a bit) on the other side, scallion and avocado both hugging the crab. Using both hands and firm pressure, lift and roll the bottom of the tortilla up and over the filling, squeezing firmly, then continue rolling tightly. Cover with damp paper towels and store in airtight container . Just before serving, with a sharp thin bladed knife, slice maki into 10 spirals.Discard the 2 end pieces. Arrange on a serving tray with a small ramekin of chipotle sour cream.
  3. Notes: * I make my black beans with onions, cumin, tomatoes,bacon,celery, carrot, bay leaf, hot sauce; but when there's no time for them, there are now available some tasty canned black beans and puree- that can be used as is or doctored.If whole, just drain them well (save the liquid), and puree them in a food processor, adding their liquid as needed. This puree should be moist enough to be easily spreadable, but not loose and wet. If it is too wet, cook it down over medium heat, stirring often so as not to burn, until it is thick and holds its own shape.
  4. ** Imitation crab sticks are available in Asian markets I find that their quality is best when Japanese and more expensive than others next to them. They freeze well and defrost very quickly ( and you can defrost just the amount you need if you bang the package on a hard surface to separate the sticks.)
  5. ***My no-muss technique for slicing avocado: Halve 1 avocado lengthwise.Twist slightly to separate halves and then remove pit by piercing it with the edge of a sharp knife and tugging.. Cradle one avocado half in palm of one hand, and have sharp knife in other hand. Gently score the avocado lengthwise, all the way through the flesh, just til you reach the shell with about ½” between the cuts. Using a soup spoon, scoop out the avocado in one or two scoops. Slices come out intact.
  6. Variations: Instead of crab sticks, try smoked chicken, smoked trout, smoked turkey, hearts of palm.
  1. Chipotle Sour Cream
  2. Chipotle Sour Cream: Mix all together except chipotles. Add them a bit at a time to make sure the mixture is not too hot for you. Adjust ingredients to taste. Flavors meld best if the sauce is made ahead. Note: I puree a can of chipotles with its adobo and keep in a small container, frozen. With a fork, I easily scrape off what I need each time.

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I am always on the lookout for innovative recipes, which is why I am just ga-ga over my recently- discovered Food52 with its amazingly innovative and talented contributors. My particular eating passions are Japanese, Indian, Mexican; with Italian and French following close behind. Turkish/Arabic/Mediterranean cuisines are my latest culinary fascination. My desert island ABCs are actually 4 Cs: citrus, cumin, cilantro, and cardamom. I am also finally indulging in learning about food history; it gives me no end of delight to learn how and when globe artichokes came to the U.S., and how and when Jerusalem artichokes went from North America to Europe. And that the Americas enabled other cuisines to become glorious. I mean where would those countries be without: Corn, Tomatoes, Chiles,Peanuts, Dried Beans, Pecans, Jerusalem Artichokes??! While I am an omnivore, I am, perhaps more than anything, fascinated by the the world of carbohydrates, particularly the innovative diversity of uses for beans, lentils and grains in South Indian and other cuisines. Baking gives me much pleasure, and of all the things I wish would change in American food, it is that we would develop an appreciation for sweet foods that are not cloyingly sweet, and that contain more multigrains. (Wouldn't it be fantastic to have a country of great bakeries instead of the drek that we have in the U.S.?!) I am so excited by the level of sophistication that I see on Food52 and hope to contribute recipes that will inspire you like yours do me. I would like to ask a favor of all who do try a recipe of mine > Would you plse write me and tell me truthfully how it worked for you and/or how you think it would be better? I know many times we feel that we don't want to hurt someone's feelings, but. i really do want your honest feedback because it can only help me improve the recipe.Thanks so much.