Beef

MY BESTEST BORSCHT: LOOK, MA, NO CABBAGE!!!

March  5, 2013
Author Notes

I'm just not a cooked cabbage fan, and with my borscht, the tomato and nutty root vegetables are the highlights, with the punch of vinegar and touch of sweetness. Over the years I have tweaked this recipe and thanks to 52, I have been cooking with a lot of greens and grains this past year, and I think they elevate this dish to a particularly healthy and satisfying level. —LE BEC FIN

  • Serves 16, 1 1/2 cups per person
Ingredients
  • 1/4 cup canola oil
  • 1/4 cup unsalted butter
  • 2 cups chopped onion in 1/3 inch dice
  • 1 Tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1 1/2 pounds canned (or fresh) whole beets,shredded (may need more)
  • 2 cups (1 pound)peeled and shredded celery root
  • 2 cups (1/2 pound) unpeeled grated parsnips
  • 1/2-3/4 cup red wine vinegar
  • 1 1/2 Tablespoons sugar
  • 6 pounds canned plum tomatoes,removed from juice and briefly chopped in food processor; and juices reserved
  • 3 medium unpeeled yukon gold potatoes, in 1/2 inch cubes
  • 1 cup parsley, soaked, drained, dried, chopped
  • 3-4 quarts full flavored beef stock
  • 1 pound cubed chuck stew beef**
  • 4-5 cups cooked 'hard'/winter wheatberries ( was 2- 2 1/2 cups raw)
  • 1 cup red chard leaves, chiffonade, soaked and drained
  • 2 cups chard stems, chopped in 1/2 inch pieces, soaked and drained
  • optional soy sauce or tamari, if flavor needs more depth
  • plain yoghurt for topping
In This Recipe
Directions
  1. In 8 quart pot, sautee onion and garlic in hot butter and oil mixture for about 5 minutes until translucent. Do not brown. Add beets through potatoes, cover and simmer 10-15 minutes, til vegetables are just cooked through.*** Add beef stock. Remove pot from heat and use some of this liquid to braise the beef for a few hours. Return pot to heat and add shredded beef and cooked wheatberries, and stir to combine.Bring to boil and simmer 20 minutes . Taste and add more beets, sugar, vinegar or tomato juices as needed for a full bodied tart flavor.** Add chard stems and leaves and simmer 5 minutes til tender.
  2. Flavor improves if it sits for a day or two. Serve hot or cold, topped with yoghurt. Freezes well .
  3. **For the beef , sear and saute the beef in some hot canola oil. Ladle borscht liquid(no vegetables) over the beef to cover. Bring to boil, stir, turn down to simmer, cover and braise 4-5 hours, stirring every now and then and replenishing liquid if needed, til beef is soft enough to shred. Remove beef from braising liquid and shred beef by pulsing briefly in food processor. Beef shank or short ribs could also be used and the bones would give extra flavor. (Ask your butcher how many pounds would be needed to yield 1 pound of meat.)
  4. *** For vegetarian guests, set aside 1 1/2 cups per person of mixture before adding beef stock and beef. Add some vegetable stock, chard aned wheatberries

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  • lapadia
    lapadia
  • Kukla
    Kukla
  • LE BEC FIN
    LE BEC FIN
Review
I am always on the lookout for innovative recipes, which is why I am just ga-ga over my recently- discovered Food52 with its amazingly innovative and talented contributors. My particular eating passions are Japanese, Indian, Mexican; with Italian and French following close behind. Turkish/Arabic/Mediterranean cuisines are my latest culinary fascination. My desert island ABCs are actually 4 Cs: citrus, cumin, cilantro, and cardamom. I am also finally indulging in learning about food history; it gives me no end of delight to learn how and when globe artichokes came to the U.S., and how and when Jerusalem artichokes went from North America to Europe. And that the Americas enabled other cuisines to become glorious. I mean where would those countries be without: Corn, Tomatoes, Chiles,Peanuts, Dried Beans, Pecans, Jerusalem Artichokes??! While I am an omnivore, I am, perhaps more than anything, fascinated by the the world of carbohydrates, particularly the innovative diversity of uses for beans, lentils and grains in South Indian and other cuisines. Baking gives me much pleasure, and of all the things I wish would change in American food, it is that we would develop an appreciation for sweet foods that are not cloyingly sweet, and that contain more multigrains. (Wouldn't it be fantastic to have a country of great bakeries instead of the drek that we have in the U.S.?!) I am so excited by the level of sophistication that I see on Food52 and hope to contribute recipes that will inspire you like yours do me. I would like to ask a favor of all who do try a recipe of mine > Would you plse write me and tell me truthfully how it worked for you and/or how you think it would be better? I know many times we feel that we don't want to hurt someone's feelings, but. i really do want your honest feedback because it can only help me improve the recipe.Thanks so much.