Weeknight CookingWhat to CookFrench CookingDinner, FasterEggs

Dinner Tonight: A Classic French Omelette

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Today: A no-frills master recipe for dinner, lunch, brunch, and beyond. 

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Chefs live or die by their omelettes. It’s often how restaurants judge a prospective hire—this seemingly simple task of scrambling eggs, putting them back together, filling, and folding. Since omelette-ing takes about 90 seconds from start to finish, there’s little margin for error. Suddenly simple doesn’t seem so simple.

If this all sounds complicated, it’s really not—especially when you have a tutorial by chef and stylist Camille Becerra in your arsenal. Sure, it takes practice, but there’s really no better time to start. It’s Bastille Day after all! Even if it’s not perfect and your omelette’s not the fluffiest or—worst case—the whole thing goes completely south, you’ll have some sort of scrambled egg or omelette situation. Which is, all yolks aside, magnifique.

Grocery List

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(Organized by area of the market)

Makes however many omelettes you'd like

Chives
Goat Cheese
Clarified Butter
Eggs (2-4 per person)
Bread (for toast, if you like)

We are assuming you already have salt and butter. If not, add those to your list, too!

Overview: 

10 minutes before dinner, thinly slice your chives and crumble your goat cheese. Slice your bread and proceed with making toast—you know how to toast and slather butter on bread. Crack 2 to 4 eggs into a bowl, season with salt, and whisk well. 

Only 5 minutes left to go (or less, probably)! Warm a non-stick pan over medium-high heat, add some clarified butter (or oil), and add your eggs. Stir aggressively with a rubber spatula. This is important: You want an airy omelette. 

Once your eggs are still soft, but holding some structure, lower your heat and add the goat cheese and chives. If you prefer another filling, substitute what you like! Use a spatula to fold the omelette onto itself as you roll your omelette out of the pan and onto a plate (see post for step-by-step photos). Serve immediately and prepare to say “oui.”

Photo by Emma Jane Kepley


Tags: dinner tonight, omelette, french, eggs, bastille day