Italian

How to Make Fresh Pasta

October  8, 2013

Inspired by conversations on the Food52 Hotline, we're sharing tips and tricks that make navigating all of our kitchens easier and more fun.

Today: We kick off our collaboration with Mario Batali's How To Tuesdays with a video on making fresh pasta.

We love the How To Tuesday videos produced by the Mario Batali restaurant group; they're all about bringing tricks and techniques into our own home kitchens, making them approachable, making them accessible. So -- naturally -- we invited them to come hang out in our kitchen with us: to share their expertise, their knowledge, their experience.

Our first video with them is, of course, how to make fresh pasta; we can't think of people more fit to teach us. Watch Chef Josh Laurano of Tarry Market single-handedly quiet those fears, those hesitations, those doubts about making pasta dough at home -- and stay tuned for how to roll it out and make ravioli, tortellini, and other filled pastas.

Got anything you want to learn from the Batali chefs? Let us know in the comments!

This video was made in collaboration with Mario Batali.

9 Comments

Mickey0627 November 5, 2013
I make my own pasta and its very good. I've tried to make pasta with white whole wheat flour, but its usually much harder to work. Do you have any suggestions? I'm assuming that the flour to liquid ratio must be different. Please help!
 
Valentina S. November 5, 2013
Hello!<br />Technically, the more gluten the flour contains and the finer it is milled, the easier it is to roll out. Every flour absorbs water differently, so you should really learn to 'feel' the dough and adjust the liquid accordingly. Also, consider that the video says to use 1 egg per cup. The correct ratio is one egg per 100 grams, and a packed cup of flour is about 125g. <br /><br />That said, even though wheat contains a lot of gluten, the rough particles of whole wheat interfere with the creation of the web of gluten that makes it possible to roll out the dough. This is why italian 00 flour, which has a talc powder consistency, gives the best results.<br /><br />You should cut your flour with at least 30% white flour, to help the texture. And definitely adjust the liquid content by adding an extra egg or, even better, water by the tablespoons until you're happier with the result.<br /><br />For more info check out my blog, there is a whole post dedicated to flours :)
 
Valentina S. October 22, 2013
Sorry about my advertising here, but while waiting for the other videos I'd like to post a rather thorough guide I wrote on making fresh pasta dough (including variations) and rolling it out with a rolling pin, as well as storing and general tips and tricks.<br />http://goo.gl/2zN4CN<br /><br />Just in case any of you would like to see the opinion of someone whose grandma worked as a pasta maker in Bologna all her life :)
 
BurgeoningBaker October 9, 2013
What the hell? So you made the dough.. how about making THE PASTA! which is what the video title states..
 
BurgeoningBaker October 9, 2013
Nevermind I see where it says that this will happen in future episodes but the title is a little misleading without saying episode 1 or something. It is my own fault for not having read after the video. I apologize.
 
darksideofthespoon October 9, 2013
Question. I made fresh pasta recently. I froze half of it, unrolled. I assume I can still thaw it out, and roll it like normal? I imagine, as long as I use a ton of flour to compensate for moisture, I'll be fine?
 
Valentina S. October 22, 2013
Hi! I see this message is a bit old, so...did you thaw it? I'm curious to see what the results were! Pasta dough shouldn't be frozen, or it would be impossible to roll out afterwards. Thaw it once it's already shaped! :)
 
Emily October 8, 2013
Oh my goodness, what a great resource! Thanks! Can't wait to watch some of these.<br /><br />~Emily from The Orange Slate<br />http://www.theorangeslate.com<br />@emilyamccord
 
laurenlocally October 8, 2013
Fresh pasta, I will now conquer you.