What is superfine sugar?

Sometimes I run across an ingredient specified as "superfine sugar" and further specified "not powdered sugar". What does it mean? Can I use regular granulated sugar? While I'm asking can someone clarify the muscovado sugar meaning? Can I use plain brown sugar? Dk or light or either?

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Lexmccall
Lexmccall January 17, 2012

This database has an excellent explanation of the differences between various sugars:
http://foodsubs.com/Sweeten...
specifically:
"Superfine sugar = ultrafine sugar = bar sugar = instant dissolving sugar = berry sugar = castor sugar = caster sugar dissolves more quickly, and is recommended for sweetening beverages, and for making meringues, cakes, soufflés, and mousses. To make your own, grind standard granulated sugar in a food processor or blender for about a minute."

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Hilarybee
Hilarybee January 17, 2012

What is the process with the recipe? I use superfine baking sugar and the brand I use is C&H. I find that is best used in a recipe when the butter and sugar is creamed together, particularly if the recipe just calls for granulated sugar- no brown sugar or powdered sugar. The crystals are so small that it creates a lovely texture in the baked good- I especially like it for sugar cookies, snickerdoodles, and shortbread. You can substitute regular granulated cane sugar, though I'd beat for longer if the recipe involves cream the butter & sugar. I would NOT sub brown sugar, muscovado or any other courser grain sugar.
When you are in the baking aisle, look for a carton of sugar with a pink label- C&H. That's what you are looking for.

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creamtea
creamtea January 22, 2012

Hilarybee, do you need to reduce the amount if subbing superfine for regular granulated sugar? I use superfine primarily for cold drinks (lemonade). Due to the finer crystals, is a cup of superfine the equivalent of a cup of regular, or is there more by weight?

Slow Cooked Pittsburgh
Slow Cooked Pittsburgh January 17, 2012

Superfine sugar is what you get when you put granulated sugar through your food processor. Start with slightly more than you need, process for a few minutes, cover the holes to prevent sugar dust from coating your kitchen, and, voila!

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lorigoldsby
lorigoldsby January 18, 2012

EXCELLENT advice SCP! i used to be able to find superfine sugar but not one of the 3 grocery chains close to the house sell it anymore, so I've been doing my own. Hillarybee is so right--makes a huge difference when creaming--it is the secret to why my chocolate silk pie is just that--silky.

luvcookbooks
luvcookbooks January 22, 2012

Thanks! Needed it to coat Seville Orange Membrillo. Found it at the UWS Fairway, where the staff are incredibly helpful. Domino's makes it. Wil be using it for meringues and sugar cookies, too. Luv knowing a sugar link.

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Hilarybee
Hilarybee January 22, 2012

Creamtea, no you do not reduce the amount of sugar when using superfine versus regular granulated sugar. It is a one to one replacement. I generally bake by weight, and I find that helps. Superfine does clump, so make sure to shake it up and break apart the clumps as to not throw off your measurements.

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