🔕 🔔
Loading…

My Basket ()

All questions

, does a potato ricer make an appreciable diff in gnocchi?

asked by @LindseyMNorris almost 5 years ago

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

11 answers 2231 views
B0e51b35 a002 4fdd adc2 f06fa947184e  baci1
HalfPint

HalfPint is a trusted home cook.

added almost 5 years ago

IMHO, no, what is important is the amount of flour added. Too much has the gnocchi is chewy and heavy. Too little and they fall apart when cooked.

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

19f2e275 c635 488f 8322 530158a23e00  food52
added almost 5 years ago

I would say yes. since you don't want any actual chunks of potato in your gnocchi dough, a ricer is a great way to ensure you get a fluffy, completely chunk free potatoes.

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 5 years ago

Well, i think that a ricer helps to aerate the potatoes so that they dry out easier before you add the flour -- so you don't need to use so much flour to make the gnocchi (which is important for gnocchi texture as HalfPint said above). I think a food mill would work too for this. Or you could mash them with a masher and put the mashed up taters on a big rimmed backing sheet so they would have a good surface area to steam off the moisture.

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

516f887e 3787 460a bf21 d20ef4195109  bigpan
added almost 5 years ago

I agree to use your 'ricer' - to make it nicer. Gnocchi is all about texture and getting the right ridges to hold the sauce.

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

79ca7fa3 11e3 4829 beae d200649eab49  walken the walk
pierino

pierino is a trusted source on General Cooking and Tough Love.

added almost 5 years ago

I'll add my voice to "yes" on the ricer. I really do think that it makes a difference. Also once you've mixed in the flour you need some skill in rolling out even width "dowels". One of my friends is expert at that part. After that you slice them and then flick them off your gnocchi form.

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 5 years ago

The ricer or a food mill work very well the amount of flour you use is important but also the tool you use for the potatoes is also as important

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 5 years ago

YES ! It makes potato "snow" with no risk of the potatoes getting gluey and tacky, or leaving them too chunky. A food processor or mixer will give you the former, a masher will give you the latter.

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

0f493ab9 068f 4498 ba2c 95c992214d52  sit2
Sam1148

Sam is a trusted home cook.

added almost 5 years ago

Not quite on topic of Gnocchi...but for potato ricers.

I don't use it for potatoes..I just don't care for super creamy mashed potatoes.
I do use it for squeezing out moisture of spinach..and for cole slaw. Salt the slaw first rinse and squeeze with the ricer and let it dry a bit and dress it so it soaks up the dressing better...and is crispy.

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

19f2e275 c635 488f 8322 530158a23e00  food52
added almost 5 years ago

brilliant!

A9f88177 5a41 4b63 8669 9e72eb277c1a  waffle3
added almost 5 years ago


Ricers also come in handy for putting the squeeze on other foods too, watermelon and grated onion for instance.

A9f88177 5a41 4b63 8669 9e72eb277c1a  waffle3
added almost 5 years ago


Um, not together I didn't mean.

Loading…

Reset
Password

  Enter your email below and we'll send you instructions on how to reset your password

Account Created

Welcome!

Logged In

Enjoy!

Email Sent

Please check your email for instructions
on how to reset your password

Successfully logged out

Let's Keep in Touch!

Get the recipes and features that have us talking, plus first dibs on events and limited-batch products.

(Oh, and $10 off your order of $50 or more in the Food52 Shop, too.)

Please enter a valid email address.