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To Salt or Not To Salt the marinade

In the Feature article “How to Make Any Marinade in 5 Steps,” (http://food52.com/blog...) Karl recommends holding off on adding any salt to the marinade and salting the dish separately, later.

Similarly, I read a helpful blog post by Cynthia (http://thesolitarycook...) that also recommended using the salt on the meat itself, at least an hour before cooking as it comes to room temperature, to allow time for the salt to be absorbed by the meat’s cells, where it will bind with water that will keep the meat moist.

But how does this technique (salting separately) compare to wet brining? Anyone know the science behind what would make one technique preferable to the other? Maybe I’m just befuddled but they seem contradictory. Thanks!

Pegeen is a trusted home cook.

asked about 5 years ago

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5 answers 22094 views
HalfPint
HalfPint

HalfPint is a trusted home cook.

added about 5 years ago

Sounds like 2 different techniques. Karl is marinading which involves an acid as the protein tenderizer, not salt. He's not brining. Cynthia is salting which is a dry-brining technique. Dry brining (salting) and wet brining operate on basically the same principal (i.e. that ultimately, the salt will bind with water to keep the moist in the meat). The difference is the delivery method of the salt between these 2 techniques of brining.

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Pegeen
Pegeen

Pegeen is a trusted home cook.

added about 5 years ago

Chef Ono - So interesting. Your info, supported by Shirley Corriher's article, might be a game changer for me. I need to go do my reading and homework. Many thanks for the time and knowledge put into your post.

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Pegeen
Pegeen

Pegeen is a trusted home cook.

added about 5 years ago

The shorthand, "brine chicken and pork" but "salt the beef" is handy. Corriher's article mentions using buttermilk and yogurt to truly tenderize. I'm familiar with those mediums for chicken and pork, but not so much for beef, so if anyone can recommend recipes they've tried that include milk-brining of beef?
Found one recipe here, Short Ribs Braised in Milk and Gorgonzola:
http://food52.com/recipes...

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