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Subbing almond flour for all-purpose flour in this recipe...

I really want to try and make this recipe:
http://ohsheglows.com/2010...
using almond flour. Is it okay in breads like these to sub equal parts almond flour for all-purpose or will it be a weird, soft mushy consistency from all the fat? Also would I decreased the coconut oil since almond flour is so moist? PLEASE HELP!

asked by Natalie over 3 years ago

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2 answers 5091 views
HalfPint
HalfPint

HalfPint is a trusted home cook.

added over 3 years ago

You can't sub out all the AP flour with the almond flour, generally. AP flour has gluten which provides structure and texture. Almond does not have any gluten. So in addition to the almond flour, you would need some sort of binder that acts like gluten (e.g xanthan gum). I also would not try to decrease the coconut oil at the same time you are trying to substitute almond flour. As a rule, I try not to change more than 1 variable at a time. I would try looking for a recipe that is designed to work with almond flour.

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drshakyhands
added over 3 years ago

I agree with HalfPint. Many of the prepackaged gluten-free flour blends would work well as a substitution, however. I frequently use America's Test Kitchen's gluten-free flour blend as a substitute for all-purpose flours that contain gluten, and follow their guidelines for when to add binders, eggs, etc. that are needed to achieve the purpose of the flour (meaning, gluten) in that recipe. I just keep a big container of their mix made up in my fridge for use as needed.

However, if you are trying to avoid grains completely (paleo), the pre-blended or ATK blend won't work for you. I think almond flour is one of the hardest "flours" to convert back to gluten-containing or grain-containing flours as it's fairly coarse and makes everything incredibly dense and has no binding capability. You could always try a little xantham gum; just remember it doesn't take a lot (think teaspoons).

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