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A question about a recipe: Seared Salmon with Cinnamon and Chili Powder

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I have a question about the recipe "Seared Salmon with Cinnamon and Chili Powder" from Sippity Sup (Greg Henry). Is the sesame oil in this meant to be toasted or non? Recent iterations have burned and I'm wondering if that is the problem (or perhaps my dash is just huge).

asked by HeatherM about 3 years ago

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8 answers 1216 views
hardlikearmour
hardlikearmour

hardlikearmour is a trusted home cook.

added about 3 years ago

If you don't get an answer from Sippity Sup, sent him a private message. I don't know how significant the difference will be in smoke point when combined with the canola oil, but light sesame oil has a higher smoke point so theoretically would be less prone to causing burning. You could also try using avocado oil in place of the canola as it's smoke point is very high. I'd also consider turning your burner down a bit.

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Jess Lynn
added about 3 years ago

Here is a handy dandy list of oils and smoke points. http://www.seriouseats...

I personally use Coconut oil for everything for the Health Benefits. http://healthjess.com/coconut...

Sippity Sup (Greg Henry)
added about 3 years ago

I use a "slick" of oil. Meaning it doesn't even puddle. The sesame is added as a "dash" (which I consider to be less than 1/8 a teaspoon) after the pan is hot. Maybe my directions don't make that clear. Someone else mentioned the "crust" and yes, that what I intended. .

HeatherM
added about 3 years ago

I can't seem to reply to Sippity Sup, so I'm responding here. Thanks - after the pan is hot definitely makes a difference! So you are using toasted sesame oil (the dark one) vs. plain (looks like canola)?

PieceOfLayerCake
PieceOfLayerCake

PieceofLayerCake is a trusted source on baking.

added about 3 years ago

I've only ever seen sesame oil used in quick stir-fries due to its volatile nature. If you're looking for that flavor, you can use the canola oil to sear it, and add it to the pan later, just to heat through with the fish. There are some oils I just steer clear of for high cooking in general.

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Susan W
Susan W

Susan W is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added about 3 years ago

You also are blackening the spices, so maybe you don't care for that? I actually never cook with sesame oil because of the low smoke point and I've been told many times that it looses it's flavor when cooked.

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sexyLAMBCHOPx
sexyLAMBCHOPx

Chops is a trusted home cook.

added about 3 years ago

Sippity Cup of course has the answer but when a recipe calls for a "dash" of sesame oil its for flavor only.

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Sippity Sup (Greg Henry)
added about 3 years ago

I've always used toasted but I can't imagine it matters too much as sexyLAMBCHOPx it's just for a subtle bit of flavor complexity and is completely optional.

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