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Looking for a lard pie crust recommendation!

I'm trying to make a pie crust that's described as "sort of cookie-like but has lard in it." If you have a pie crust that fits this description, I'd very much appreciate it! Thank you!

Assistant Editor, Food52

asked 12 months ago
12 answers 782 views
4caa0af8 566e 43ab 992b 57e8725a8b1a  joey
added 12 months ago

can you elaborate? Like a sugar cookie or a snickerdoodle or a shortbread type of texture? I use lard in my pie crusts, but I don't think I'd call it "cookie-like"

Deb82d16 cecc 4f1f 868a 031700ad2ca0  leslie stephens food copy
Leslie Stephens

Assistant Editor, Food52

added 12 months ago

"Cookie-like" is the only information I have. I'm trying to surprise something and that's unfortunately all the information I have to go off of as far as the crust goes, but I think it has the texture of a sugar cookie, but it's a pie crust—if that helps?

4798a9c2 4c90 45e5 a5be 81bcb1f69c5c  junechamp
ChefJune

June is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added 12 months ago

You don't need a "lard recipe." You can replace the formerly espoused shortening 1 for 1 with lard. That works fine.

Deb82d16 cecc 4f1f 868a 031700ad2ca0  leslie stephens food copy
Leslie Stephens

Assistant Editor, Food52

added 12 months ago

Good to know! Do you have one that you recommend?

4798a9c2 4c90 45e5 a5be 81bcb1f69c5c  junechamp
ChefJune

June is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added 12 months ago

I asked my culinary daughter who is a pastry chef in UK She thought it sounded like a shortbread crust. here's her recipe:
7 oz plain flour
4 oz equal mix of butter and lard, cubed
2-3 tbsp of ice cold water
Pinch of salt
• Place the flour, butter and salt into a large clean bowl.
• Rub the butter into the flour with your fingertips until the mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs, working as quickly as possible to prevent the dough becoming warm.
• Add the water to the mixture and using a cold knife stir until the dough binds together, add more cold water a teaspoon at a time if the mixture is too dry.

4798a9c2 4c90 45e5 a5be 81bcb1f69c5c  junechamp
ChefJune

June is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added 12 months ago

I asked my culinary daughter who is a pastry chef in UK She thought it sounded like a shortbread crust. here's her recipe:
7 oz plain flour
4 oz equal mix of butter and lard, cubed
2-3 tbsp of ice cold water
Pinch of salt
• Place the flour, butter and salt into a large clean bowl.
• Rub the butter into the flour with your fingertips until the mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs, working as quickly as possible to prevent the dough becoming warm.
• Add the water to the mixture and using a cold knife stir until the dough binds together, add more cold water a teaspoon at a time if the mixture is too dry.

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
Cav
added 12 months ago

Most probably British and almost certainly a Shortcrust pastry. Look for recipes from Ramsay, 2 Fat Ladies, Hairy Bikers, Nigel Slater, Nigella Lawson.

4caa0af8 566e 43ab 992b 57e8725a8b1a  joey
added 12 months ago

I'm not sure if this would help you to any great degree (chefjune's post seemed to be about the most plausible explanation), but I posted my recipe for Lard and Vodka pie crust here:
https://food52.com/recipes...

B3038408 42c1 4c18 b002 8441bee13ed3  new years kitchen hlc only
AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added 12 months ago

Mimi Sheraton, a food critic at the New York Times from the mid seventies to mid eighties - first female food critic there, by the way - published in one of her cookbooks in the early 80s a recipe for "Murbeteig or Sugar-Cookie Dough", which she got from a German chef who was well known in New York City at the time. Mürbeteig is a German sweet short crust pastry. I've never made this recipe with lard instead of butter, but don't see any reason why one could not do so.

I checked the Times archives and happily, the recipe was also published in the Times while Sheraton was there, and has been reformatted for current access: http://cooking.nytimes...
That's where I'd start. (I'd use half butter and half lard, for the butter flavor.) ;o)

88afa98e fd9c 4e61 af72 03658638b6cb  eight ball 600px
cv
added 12 months ago

I would try recipes for pâte brisée or pâte sucrée. The latter has the addition of sugar. These are two French names for shortcrust pastry dough variants.

I can't tell by the nebulous description whether you are trying to duplicate just the texture of a sugar cookie or if you wanted some of the actual sweetness in the dough.

I'm sure the dough recipes from any reputable source should be fine. Most will probably be butter based, but you should be able replace the butter with lard.

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added 12 months ago

Pate Sablee, you can use it for biscuits or crust.

1097a5b5 1775 4eec a8ea 7421137b65dc  image 2 apples claire sullivan 2
amysarah

amysarah is a trusted home cook.

added 12 months ago

The most cookie-like crust (sweet/crumbly as opposed to flaky) I know is Pate Sablee. In fact, scraps can be baked into cookies. I typically use it for e.g., lemon or chocolate tarts - my go to is Patricia Wells' recipe. No lard, but I'd guess you could sub it for part of the butter.

However, it's typically used for tarts - hard to roll (pushing it into place in a tart pan work great) so maybe difficult for a pie with top crust.