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duck for one

The local market with excellent poultry has whole duck on sale. I have made the really easy duck confit several times and love it. If I bought a whole duck and used the legs for confit what would be a good prep for the balance? Could I use the Merril's slow roast method on the balance of the frame? Flattened maybe? I have the time to cook duck this weekend but no company expected. Would you advise freezing the legs for use in confit later? Alternately I could hold them maybe 2 days in the seasoning and then maybe a few days after cooking? I have several times reheated them as I tend to have them finish cooking about 9 PM.

asked by caninechef 12 months ago
2 answers 317 views
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Nancy

Nancy is a trusted home cook.

added 12 months ago

I have broken a duck down and cooked it for one. Recommend cooking now and then freezing in portions, if or when you have leftovers. Can use any recipe you have and cook the duck parts (assume you save the legs for confit); also can use chicken recipes and substitute duck parts. Also here are 2 recipes I like:
Curried Ginger Duck with Rhubarb (use frozen if not in season)
nytimes.com/2009/06/10/dining/102arex.html?ref=dining
Vietnamese Duck Salad
nytimes.com/2011/08/03/dining/vietnamese-grilled-duck-salad-w/-cucumber-radishes-and-peanuts-recipes.html?Ref=dining

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cv
added 12 months ago

You can freeze the legs for future use; I've made great confit from frozen duck legs that I purchased at a local market.

Once you remove the legs, you will have the two breasts, two wings, and a little other meat, plus the carcass.

My natural inclination would be to pan sauté boneless breasts, especially with meat from a fresh bird. A bone-in breast roast might be a pleasant change.

I would freeze the wings with the legs (for confit) and make stock with the carcass.