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Food safety

I have a stone pot. But got it at a consignment store. Any opinions about its safety?

Meg is a trusted home cook.

asked over 2 years ago

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26 answers 1495 views
cv
cv
added over 2 years ago

Here is my opinion: if you heat it to a high enough temperature for cooking and don't use harsh chemical cleaners, it'll last a long time, just like similar vessels have successfully been used for millennia.

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luvcookbooks
luvcookbooks

Meg is a trusted home cook.

added over 2 years ago

I'm going for a longer life expectancy than people had millennia ago.

cv
cv
added over 2 years ago

Fair enough.

The Japanese don't take any special measures with their stone/ceramic cookware and they have the longest life expectancy on the planet.

Susan W
Susan W

Susan W is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added over 2 years ago

Do you mean like this or true stone?

http://www.amazon.com/Korean...

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luvcookbooks
luvcookbooks

Meg is a trusted home cook.

added over 2 years ago

It looks like true stone w am wooden handles. I soaked the wood w water before I put the dish in the oven. It has a beautiful stone top as well.

Susan W
Susan W

Susan W is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added over 2 years ago

While I don't have experience owning one, I do know the reason they glaze the pots that I have is that the true stone versions had quite a few health risks. Lead, arsenic..and more. Unfortunately, I don't know if that's common with all stone pots or the ones from Korea. I know just enough to know that I'd want some very specific feedback. I'd check around until I found someone who knew for sure.

It sounds lovely. Can you post a photo?

Susan W
Susan W

Susan W is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added over 2 years ago

Okay...food52 is haunted. My email says you responded and said "photo is up...etc." I don't see your response here and no, I see no photo. Weird.

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luvcookbooks
luvcookbooks

Meg is a trusted home cook.

added over 2 years ago

Tried uploading the same photo as a new question. We may need food52 editorial expertise.

Susan W
Susan W

Susan W is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added over 2 years ago

So odd. I have noticed my email sometimes says there's a new post and what the post is and poof..it's not there when I go to look. Doesn't happen often.

Can you see your photos? I looked at the new post, but it's not there either.

cookbookchick
added over 2 years ago

I see both photos.

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Nancy
Nancy

Nancy is a trusted home cook.

added over 2 years ago

I know you asked our help, but this process seems tortured, with all the photo & long distance aspects.
Is there possibly someone local you can consult, with the pot in hand?

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luvcookbooks
luvcookbooks

Meg is a trusted home cook.

added over 2 years ago

If I had someone close I would ask them. Could always take my pot to a cookware store but we just had 27 inches of snow and parking is next to impossible. Don't follow the thread if too awkward. I am finding it so helpful and appreciate all the comments.

Nancy
Nancy

Nancy is a trusted home cook.

added over 2 years ago

Not objecting to the thread. Understand about the snow. Just wondered if someone knowledgeable could help by seeing it in person.

amysarah
amysarah

amysarah is a trusted home cook.

added over 2 years ago

Can't identify your pot, but just to correct one bit of misinformation here - soapstone isn't porous. One reason its become popular for kitchen counter tops (and was used in labs for years) is because being nonporous, it resists stains and bacteria doesn't grow in it. It's also why it doesn't require sealing and resealing, like marble/granite (just an occasional oiling to keep it pretty.) If you're interested, Vermont Soapstone's website has some good info - not about cooking pots, but some - like about caring for it - might be helpful: http://vermontsoapstone... (I don't work for them ;D Have just used it in several kitchens.)

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Susan W
Susan W

Susan W is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added over 2 years ago

Amysarah, if you are referring to my comment, I was referring to Korean Bibimbap bowls (not their true name, but it's what I use mine for) and not soapstone bowls. I am not sure what kind of stone is used, but levels of arsenic etc. we're found which is why I chose a glazed version. This was early on in the convo before soapstone was brought up. Just clearing up the misinformation you mentioned.

amysarah
amysarah

amysarah is a trusted home cook.

added over 2 years ago

No, Susan W, was referring to something Guardian Chef's mentioned. (I just skimmed this thread - actually, didn't even see your comment.)

Susan W
Susan W

Susan W is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added over 2 years ago

Oh good..just didn't want anyone to rush out and buy the stone pots I'm referring to until they look into the claims. Apparently, these pots are/were made from a porous stone.

cookbookchick
added over 2 years ago

I'm noticing that some comments, like the photos, aren't always appearing here. This might be because the Hotline app is wonky and no longer being supported, if that's what some of us are using. Anyway, Meg, I think it was you who mentioned Broadway Panhandler. Have you seen the news that they're closing this spring? NYTimes ran a story.

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luvcookbooks
luvcookbooks

Meg is a trusted home cook.

added over 2 years ago

Yes. I have only been there once but always felt confident knowing that it was around.

luvcookbooks
luvcookbooks

Meg is a trusted home cook.

added over 2 years ago

Original Soapstone of Vermont, Uncommon Goods and Viva Terra all sell soapstone pots and pans.

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cookbookchick
added over 2 years ago

Kaufmann Mercantile has some, too.

Benedikt
added over 2 years ago

2 things you should watch out for. ARSEN and LEAD. both are used in CHEAP kitchenware. so if you are not sure it comes from a reputable dealer, make enquiries. i do not know where you live, but there are customer organisations in the yellow pages or on the Internet who can help you.

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henandchicks
added over 2 years ago

Tests to ascertain the lead content of your item are easily available online and in shops. They are not expensive or hard to use. It looks like a nice pot, but it can't hurt to be careful, either. (When they are being kind my nears and dears call my Captain Safety Pants...less kind moments I am called Killjoy)

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