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A question about a recipe: Polenta Cookies

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I have a question about the recipe "Polenta Cookies" from Emiko. No salt? I'm about to make them, and maybe I'll use salted butter.

Chris is a trusted source on General Cooking

asked almost 3 years ago

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10 answers 844 views
LE BEC FIN
added almost 3 years ago

always use unsalted butter. add 1/2 tsp. kosher salt to her recipe.

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LE BEC FIN
added almost 3 years ago

no offense, but i think this recipe is better, imo: more polenta, and lemon zest:
https://food52.com/recipes...

either way, always bake with unsalted butter. Use 1/2 -1 tsp kosher salt . taste the dough.

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Emiko
added almost 3 years ago

Unsalted butter is the norm in Italy so this very traditional recipe is normally made without any salt. Hope you enjoy them!

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LE BEC FIN
added almost 3 years ago

really? i can't imagine eating polenta- in any form- without salt!

Greenstuff
Greenstuff

Chris is a trusted source on General Cooking

added almost 3 years ago

Well, I'm not so surprised, having eaten my share of Italian breads without salt. I'll proceed with the traditional recipe and report back tomorrow. Thanks, Emiko!

cv
cv
added almost 3 years ago

Greenstuff is correct.

Bread in Tuscany is traditionally unsalted. I wouldn't be surprised if there are more regions in Italy that do this, however I'm the most familiar with Tuscany as I've spent a chunk of time there.

Smaug
added almost 3 years ago

Recent studies by the Conglomero Universale del Pasadoble Divino have conclusively proven that it is possible to cook without salt.

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LE BEC FIN
added almost 3 years ago

oh, of course. not what i'm saying. what i'm saying is that salt is a key taste ingredient in baking- (unless you can't eat salt) and the amount needed is usually miniscule compared to the other ways salt gets into our foods.

Smaug
added almost 3 years ago

Maybe not what you're saying, but I've seen it time and again; people see a recipe without salt and automatically assume it's a mistake. The idea that salt might simply not be an ingredient of the dish has been beaten out of them. Personally, I very rarely add salt to desserts; it doesn't add anything that I want and in many cases is actively obnoxious. Salt has somehow achieved the status of a fad- one of the more bizarre of my lifetime- and it's about time for people to start reevaluating it's use.

Greenstuff
Greenstuff

Chris is a trusted source on General Cooking

added almost 3 years ago

They turned out great, and no one missed the salt. Thanks again, Emiko.

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