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Can You Freeze Lard?

I'm making a recipe that calls for lard. I bought a brick of it and will have quite a bit leftover. Can this be frozen for future use? If so, for how long? Thanks! BB

BerryBaby is trusted source on General Cooking

asked 3 months ago
8 answers 317 views
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added 3 months ago

Hi BerryBaby! You can definitely freeze lard, just like you might freeze butter. And you could freeze it just as long as you would freeze butter, too—probably at least a year.

4caa0af8 566e 43ab 992b 57e8725a8b1a  joey
added 3 months ago

yes, you can freeze lard, but it does keep beautifully in the fridge. what are you making that requires lard? Pie crust?

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pierino

pierino is a trusted source on General Cooking and Tough Love.

added 3 months ago

There's lard, lard and then there's lardo. If it's in a brick it's probably Mexican style which lasts quite awhile in the fridge without freezing. Then there is leaf lard which is the most desirable for cooking. You can use it for frying or baking. In Italy there is lardo which is eaten just by itself in thin, thin shavings, sometimes wrapped around grissini. The Italian "struto" would be closer to our lard.

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BerryBaby

BerryBaby is trusted source on General Cooking

added 3 months ago

It's Mexican lard and I'm making Cuban rolls. The dough turned out beautifully! I'll snap a photo of the finished product later tonight. Thanks for your replies! BB

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cv
added 3 months ago

@Rachel:

At least here on the West Coast, the typical consumer-grade lard found in regular supermarkets is manufactured by Armour and comes in a green and white box, one side labeled "Manteca" in large letters.

23d08e08 3b57 4e81 adcd 91701fc50809  fb avatar
added 3 months ago

Manteca is the Spanish word for lard (also butter). I'm far from a connoiseur, but good Mexican grocers with a butcher will supply fresh lard for all sorts of purposes. The stuff available in white bricks at the grocery store is heavily processed and extremely bland- I doubt it has a national identity.

4caa0af8 566e 43ab 992b 57e8725a8b1a  joey
added 3 months ago

I'm not familiar with Mexican Lard, I've used both lard in brick form... Morrell's snow cap lard is my go-to brand (aka manteca) and leaf lard from Wagshal's butcher and grocery, but have never heard of the manteca I buy by the one pound blocks referred to as mexican lard. Is that what you're talking about?

50e6ebd3 b4c9 4d51 bd5e 1163afa4ba06  2013wreath
BerryBaby

BerryBaby is trusted source on General Cooking

added 3 months ago

The bread turned out great, nice texture and chew. I'd make it again!

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