Put too much vinigar in my lamb shanks. Any way I can cut the acid?

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ChefDaddy
ChefDaddy February 4, 2011

Not enough info to give an answer.

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hardlikearmour
hardlikearmour February 4, 2011

I agree with ChefDaddy, more info would be better. That being said you can generally cut acid with either sugar or fat depending on your application.

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Euro Kat
Euro Kat February 4, 2011

Iasked that question: Here's the recipe:
http://www.zencancook.com/2010/01/braised-lamb-shanks-recipe/
Made it often, it's the BEST. Put twice the vinigar in this time. Wonder if I could cut it with baking soda? Nothing else has worked. Hate to toss this double recipe!!







Hi, I am the ine who sms-ed the question. Here is the recipe:

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Chef Merlin
Chef Merlin February 4, 2011

Even with 1/2 white vinegar in your braise the lamb can still be rescued.

One of the easiest steps I would take is to increase the amount of stock (i.e. Chicken, preferably Beef, Veal or Lamb) to balance out the acidity. Stock has a high concentration of salt and fat with concentrated flavor that can easily mellow out the acidity.

If your lamb is fully braised and cooked, I would reduce the stock with mirepoix and even some red wine if necessary until it is rich and syrupy (i.e. a rich and highly concentrated meat flavor). I would then add the cold lamb into this reduced sauce and reheat the lamb, in hopes the reduced flavor will blend with the vinegar within the lamb and mask the vinegar intensity.

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Chef's Hat
Chef's Hat February 5, 2011

You also might try adding some sugar. It neutralizes some of the acid.
It's not the most refining solution, but definitely does the trick.

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Chef's Hat
Chef's Hat February 5, 2011

You also might try adding some sugar. It neutralizes some of the acid.
It's not the most refining solution, but definitely does the trick.

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Pat E. in SLO
Pat E. in SLO February 5, 2011

Agreeing with Merlin...just keep increasing your braising liquid with broth and the same sauted veggies you were originally using until it tastes right. The meat will be fine and you'll have lots of sauce for your dish... or to turn into soup later. Other ingredients like sugar will chanage the flavor making it sweet/sour....which could be good but may not be what you're after. Extra sauce is always good!

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