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After cooking veal in a skillet, it turn turned gray rather than browning. Any thoughts as to why?

After cooking veal in a skillet, it turn turned gray rather than browning. The veal was dipped in egg/butter then dredged in flour. I used a skillet that is not non-stick. Any thoughts as to why the veal turned grey rather than browning?

asked by Toby Murphy 8 months ago

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12 answers 1433 views
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Maedl

Margie is a trusted home cook immersed in German foodways.

added 8 months ago

What kind of cut did you use? A thin slice? Why did you add butter to the egg mixture? Did you crowd you crowd the veal in the pan? Did you fry it too slowly?

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added 8 months ago

It wad a thin slice of top round. I addrd butter as the recipe called for it. I don't think the pan was crowded and it was fried for a few minutes on each side.

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Maedl

Margie is a trusted home cook immersed in German foodways.

added 8 months ago

I use a cast iron frying pan, which produces crisp, golden crusts. I don't think adding butter to the egg caused your problem, but I don't think it is something that you need to do to get a good crust. Egg yolk has fat in it. You need to add the meat to a pan in which you have heated the oil or butter before you put the meat in.

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added 8 months ago

Thanks so much! I'll work on getting the oil and butter hotter in the pan. I didn't use oil the first time. Any specific recipes you can share?

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Maedl

Margie is a trusted home cook immersed in German foodways.

added 8 months ago

What are you making? Wiener schnitzel? You can never go wrong with Joseph Wechsberg. Have a look at this on the Guardian: https://www.theguardian...

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amysarah

amysarah is a trusted home cook.

added 8 months ago

It sounds like your pan wasn't hot enough, and also probably cooled a little when the meat hit the oil. (Crowding could add to the problem, but you say that wasn't the issue.)

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C5128fec 77c5 4cad a1dd f964581311e1  fb avatar
added 8 months ago

That definitely makes sense regarding the pan. I didn't use oil though. I used butter. Could this make a difference? Also, any suggestions on which pan to use as I still have more to veal to cook.

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creamtea

Lisanne is a trusted home cook.

added 8 months ago

Cast iron gets hotter than non-stick so will brown the meat better. Also was it patted dry (with a paper towel) before you dipped it in the coating? If it was too "wet" that could cause steam and prohibit browning. Crowding the pan also can lead to a poor result as Maedl said).

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added 8 months ago

Meat is often soaked b butchers before sale- if it releases a lot of moisture in the pan it won't brown normally and will tend to come up gray- even if you boil off the moisture, your fond will tend to be more in the pan than on the meat.

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ChefJune

June is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added 8 months ago

There are a whole host of reasons, but the most likely is that your pan was not hot enough when you put the veal in. In order for your meat (or anything else, fir that matter) to sear properly, the pan - and the fat in it - needs to be hot before you put anything else in. Dropping a small cube of bread into the fat is a good way to test if you hear and see the sizzle.
As well, to ensure your coating sticks, it's usually a three-step process: 1) dip in seasoned flour and shake the extra off; 2) dip in beaten egg; 3) dip in seasoned crumbs or again into flour.

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23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added 8 months ago

Would Toby have been better off using an oil with a higher smoking rather than the butter?

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4798a9c2 4c90 45e5 a5be 81bcb1f69c5c  junechamp
ChefJune

June is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added 8 months ago

Butter is fine, but it helps to add a bit of oil with a higher smoke point. This keeps the butter from burning so easily.

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