A question about a recipe: Helen Getz’s Napa Cabbage with Hot Bacon Dressing

I live in Europe (in London), and I'd love to make this recipe, as it sounds wonderful. However, I can't seem to find 'nappa cabbage' here- what would be a good replacement, do you think?

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littleknitter
littleknitter March 21, 2011

You can probably use regular green cabbage or savoy cabbage instead - it'll take a little longer to cook, but is a pretty close substitute.

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littleknitter
littleknitter March 21, 2011

P.S. Given the choice between cabbage and savoy cabbage, I'd go with the Savoy it you can get it.

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Cassandra2011
Cassandra2011 March 21, 2011

Many thanks, I can certainly get hold of Savoy cabbage here so will give it a go!

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Rhonda35
Rhonda35 August 19, 2014

I think it's called "Chinese" cabbage in the UK, if I remember correctly. Baby bok choy would work, as would escarole.

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Maedl
Maedl August 20, 2014

Savoy cabbage would work well, but so would plain, everyday cabbage. If you use regular cabbage, slice it much more finely than that in the recipe's photo. You could also use dandelion greens, escarole, frisee, or even romaine. My grandmother made a similar dressing that she used on lettuce as well as cabbage.

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Droplet
Droplet August 20, 2014

You could also use the Dutch pointed cabbage. It has a very distinct pointed edge on one end and the leaves are less compact than traditional cabbage.

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Maedl
Maedl August 20, 2014

That would also be a good cabbage to use--do the Dutch have a version, too? It is one of the German passengers on the Slow Food Ark and its origins go back to the 1500s and Denkendorf Abbey, not too far from Stuttgart.

Jan Weber
Jan Weber August 20, 2014

Look for "Chinese leaf" or "Chinese cabbage". It's also called "Hakusai" in Japanese.

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