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Which kosher salt does Food 52 use in it's recipes? I have heard that Crystal and Morton vary in strength which could matter in baked goods.

asked by Robin O'D almost 5 years ago
12 answers 2150 views
22b9ddc9 fc61 48a3 949e dee341974288  liz and dad
added almost 5 years ago

I only use Diamond Crystal Kosher salt for cooking, baking, everything. Occasionally grind coarse sea salt when I'm seasoning stuff.

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drbabs

Barbara is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added almost 5 years ago

Ditto mrslarkin.

3639eee1 5e0d 4861 b1ed 149bd0559f64  gator cake
hardlikearmour

hardlikearmour is a trusted home cook.

added almost 5 years ago

I prefer Diamond, and try to specify when I write a recipe.

B9464ce6 76f7 41db a563 e5ad504521bf  2016 04 05 23 37 37
added almost 5 years ago

They don't vary in strength but in weight. So a tablespoon of one does't equal a tablespoon of another. I am pretty sure, but you may want to check, that Diamond Crystal weighs less than Morton.

4798a9c2 4c90 45e5 a5be 81bcb1f69c5c  junechamp
ChefJune

June is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added almost 5 years ago

Morton's Kosher salt has unnecessary additives, much like their table salt. I don't won't buy or use it. And I find it interesting that Whole Foods only carries Morton's.

When I'm measuring a recipe by weight, I weigh all the ingredients each time.

67544da8 1862 4539 8ec8 2d9dfc2601bb  dsc 0122.nef 1
added almost 5 years ago

Diamond here as well..

C0d1f1de 4134 43ba 9510 1d7a8caa31f3  scan0004
added almost 5 years ago

You asked which brand food52 uses -- since recipes here are submitted by many individuals, there is no 'right' one, but as you see, Diamond is the preferred brand. If the recipe doesn't specify, I would suggest you use Diamond -- by volume (tsp, etc) measure, Morton is 'saltier' -- weighs more and therefore has more sodium. You can always add more to taste.

5c97b973 e0d0 4251 87ba 9d239fc9ab08  image
added almost 5 years ago

Thanks everyone. I have tried to find Diamond Crystal at the grocery store, but have had no luck. Also, I guess when I wrote Food 52, I was referring to Amanda and Merrill. I just made the peach tart and am planning on making the applesauce cake and I am doubting my salt measurements. I guess I should just ask under the specific recipes. Thanks for your help, I will have to double my efforts to find the Diamond Crystal.

Wholefoods user icon
added almost 5 years ago

The difference between Morton and Diamond is crystal size; Diamond's larger crystals take up more room for an equivalent weight than do Morton"s. The generally-accepted formula is: if a recipe calls for 1 teaspoon of table salt, use 1-1/2 teaspoons of Morton's or 2 teaspoons of Diamond's, to obtain an equivalent weight. Also, Morton's does have additives to prevent caking or clumping (recall their slogan, "When it rains, it pours"); like others, I only use Diamond. Note, however, that using Diamond will not provide iodine, which may be an issue for persons living far from salt water or with otherwise compromised diets. Weighing everything is an admirable goal, but not everyone has a scale accurate enough to deal with small but precise amounts, as in baking.

445e20c3 ae7c 4384 a5f7 c63a3b70db4d  img 2825
added almost 5 years ago

Same as mrslarkin. I don't like the taste of Morton's nor the additives.

905240fe bd99 409e a391 2797c6e0f601  photo 9
added almost 5 years ago

Diamond Crystall all the all the all the way.

Salt101.com is super entertaining, too!

84baef1b 1614 4c3d a895 e859c9d40bd1  chris in oslo
Greenstuff

Chris is a trusted source on General Cooking

added almost 5 years ago

I don't use tons of salt--so unless I have a special project that requires a whole lot, I go ahead and use my expensive sea salts and specialty rock salts. Another foodpickle question taught me that Maldon, a big flaky seasalt salt, actually works well in baked goods. And since mine came in what seemed like a big box, I've been using it in a lot of other cooking too.