A question about a recipe: Sephardic Megedarra with Garlicky Brown Rice Pilaf

I have a question about step 1 on the recipe "Sephardic Megedarra with Garlicky Brown Rice Pilaf" from creamtea. It says:

"Heat plenty of water in kettle until boiling. In a large saucepan, heat olive oil until hot but not smoking over medium high heat. Add garlic and bay leaves, and saute until fragrant and bubbly. Add rice, stirring until rice appears "tweedy." "

My question is: What do you mean by "tweedy"? Can you describe this, or perhaps take a photo of rice in the "tweedy" stage?

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creamtea
creamtea December 2, 2011

Stir for about 7 minutes; some grains of rice will have opaque white patches on them, as well as the brown translucent parts, reminiscent of tweed fabric, a woolen fabric that has a mottled appearance.

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susan g
susan g December 2, 2011

"Tweedy" should be added to everyone's dictionary of culinary terms -- it's perfect, creamtea!

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creamtea
creamtea December 4, 2011

Thanks, susan, but it's not original to me. It's from Jean Anderson's recipe for Portuguese rice in her book, The Food of Portugal. I liked the term, it's so descriptive, especially for brown rice!

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