Bread

The Curious Case of No-Flour, No-Yeast Rolls

March 16, 2017

When KyMorgan inquired about cauliflower toast as a low-carb alternative for English muffins in eggs Benedict on our Hotline, I was immediately intrigued. How would cauliflower toast differ from cauliflower "steak"? And how would it stand up to sweet potato toast and all the other "toasts" out there? What even is toast, anyway?

And the answers to KyMorgan's question led me to the entrance to another internet rabbit hole: Oopsie Rolls. "Take a look at 'oopsie' rolls (recipes all over the internet)," inpatskitchen advised. And Pat was right—the recipes are all over the internet, and the name is only half of what makes them interesting.

I feel as confused about these as you do!! 🤔

A post shared by sarahjampel (@sarahjampel) on

Oopsie rolls are made of just four ingredients—cream cheese, egg, cream of tartar, and salt (that's right, no flour)—and have a fluffy, airy texture and slightly eggy flavor that might remind you of an unbelted popover or Yorkshire pudding.

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Their name derives from their origin story: The oopsie roll was invented by Cleochatra, a blogger who also thought up the cauliflower pizza "crust," when she made a mistake baking Atkins Revolution Rolls and used cream cheese in place of the called-for cottage cheese. (You can also make a similar bun using sour cream or mascarpone.)

Exploring oopsie roll recipes might serve as your introduction to a thriving online low-carb community you never knew existed, among which the batter is hailed as a nearly carb-less foundation for making bread and its relatives. People have experimented with pizza and sponge cake, roulade and danish.

What do you taste like?

But even if you don't know (or care to know) the first thing about counting carbs, and even if you love eating bread (I love eating bread!), oopsie rolls are still worth making. Incredibly simple and quick to make, they really are a great alternative if you find yourself with no bread in the house and a longing for something slightly squishy to sandwich your bacon between.

Aren't these the most amazing little treasures?
An Oopsie Roll review on Food.com

I enjoyed their near-marshmallow lightness and the slight tang of the cream cheese. Plus, the eggy flavor makes them the perfect candidate for a topping of melty cheese (consider toasting the baked oopsie rolls in the oven first, for more color and crispiness).

They're certainly not bread, and maybe they're not "rolls" either—but they still are tasty.

Here's how to make them:

Heat the oven to 300° F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Then spray that parchment paper with nonstick cooking spray (the oopsie rolls have a tendency to stick, like wet meringues).

Carefully separate 3 eggs. In a large bowl, mix the yolks with 3 ounces of cream cheese, slightly soft and cut into cubes, and a pinch of salt. You want the mixture to be uniform and as lump-free as possible.

Pre-fold and mid-fold.

In a separate bowl, whisk the egg whites and 1/8 teaspoon of cream of tartar (which stabilizes them) to stiff peaks.

Now spoon the egg whites onto the egg yolk mixture and fold gently with a rubber spatula, being careful not to deflate the airy whites. (Now's a time when you don't want to over-mix: Stop folding as soon as, or just before, no white streaks remain.)

Before the bake.

Use a large spoon to make 6 circles of batter on your prepped baking sheet, slightly flattening out each one. (If you have a muffin top pan, now would be the time to drag it out.)

Bake for 25 to 30 minutes, or until golden-brown all over.

Oopsies are rather flat—you'll need two to make one sandwich.
The underside of an oopsie.

Let the oopsies hang out on the pan until cool enough to handle, then use a large spatula to transfer them to a wire rack.

The leftovers can be stored in a sealed bag in the refrigerator for about three days.

Oopsies on the inside.

Have you ever made oopsie rolls? Tell us in the comments!

30 Comments

Linda March 22, 2017
I can't think of any reason they couldn't be frozen nor do I see a reason why you couldn't bake them in a muffin or popover tin. Be sure to grease the pan well or they will stick to it, even if the pan is nonstick coat, as I found when I used my muffin top pan. The muffin top pan makes them evenly round and the right size for a burger bun. Testing them as muffins and freezing them are both on my recipe test to do list. Testing and creating recipes is kind of my thing, but I have a neverending list of recipe projects. I haven't gotten to this one yet. :)
 
Catherine March 22, 2017
These look great! Does anyone know if they freeze? And can you bake them in another form - say a muffin or popover tin? Gluten-free popovers would be so great!
 
Laura March 20, 2017
I made these 8 or 9 years ago when they first came out and love them! You have to follow the recipe exactly or it doesn't work. I saw in later years people added spices to it to give it a little different flavor. I'm so glad you credited the original author of this recipe. It has been stolen so many times. Thanks for posting it and thanks for your integrity.
 
Jamie/cleochatra March 20, 2017
A good friend of mine told me about this article. Thank you so much for your kind words! They mean so much. ~cleochatra
 
Jamie/cleochatra March 20, 2017
A good friend of mine told me about this article. Thank you so much for your kind words! They mean so much. ~cleochatra
 
Author Comment
Sarah J. March 20, 2017
Wow!! So cool to hear from you directly :)
 
Jamie/cleochatra March 20, 2017
Hi, Sarah! Thank you so very much for your kindness! So many of my recipes have been around so long, it's not often I'm granted credit for them anymore. It's always a blessing seeing they've helped someone. Your article made me so excited, I showed everyone! I did sell my site a few years back, but I miss the foodie world (I've been a fan of your site for years). You may have just inspired me to create some more recipes. Thanks again! My friends and I so appreciate you.
 
Jamie/cleochatra March 20, 2017
Hi, Sarah! Thank you so very much for your kindness! So many of my recipes have been around so long, it's not often I'm granted credit for them anymore. It's always a blessing seeing they've helped someone. Your article made me so excited, I showed everyone! I did sell my site a few years back, but I miss the foodie world (I've been a fan of your site for years). You may have just inspired me to create some more recipes. Thanks again! My friends and I so appreciate you.
 
Jamie/cleochatra March 20, 2017
Sorry. My posts double post. I swear there's not an echo on here.
 
stacey L. March 20, 2017
These are very close to the rolls that were part of the original Atkins diet in the 70's and were in the cookbook.
 
Author Comment
Sarah J. March 20, 2017
Yep! I mentioned that they were made as a riff (or, well, a mistake!) on the original Atkins recipe.
 
Muriel J. March 19, 2017
I have just cooked and tasted the oopsie rolls, they are absolutely yummy, and they melt in your mouth, I had just enough Cream Cheese left over from another recipe, so Googled to find a recipe to use up my small amount of Cream Cheese, and what a find, and so easy to make, I will be making them again that's for sure.
 
Kay D. March 27, 2017
I have a goat's milk, cow's milk blend greek yogurt. It is as thick (maybe thicker) than sour cream. Stiff almost like a beaten cream cheese. I wonder if it would work in place of the cream cheese? (I don't care for cream cheese). I've seen this recipe, but never tried it.
 
Nora March 19, 2017
I'm intrigued, and wondering, is this for breakfast? Snacking? What goes with?
 
Donna March 20, 2017
It's zero car 'bread' used to replace regular breads by folks following low carb and ketogenic diets. We use them to make sandwiches. Haven't tried toasting it yet. It holds up real well under even really messy fixings.<br />
 
Donna March 20, 2017
It's zero car 'bread' used to replace regular breads by folks following low carb and ketogenic diets. We use them to make sandwiches. Haven't tried toasting it yet. It holds up real well under even really messy fixings.<br />
 
Donna March 20, 2017
It's zero car 'bread' used to replace regular breads by folks following low carb and ketogenic diets. We use them to make sandwiches. Haven't tried toasting it yet. It holds up real well under even really messy fixings.<br />
 
Donna March 20, 2017
It's zero car 'bread' used to replace regular breads by folks following low carb and ketogenic diets. We use them to make sandwiches. Haven't tried toasting it yet. It holds up real well under even really messy fixings.<br />
 
Donna March 20, 2017
Oh my gosh! Sorry everybody! I had NO idea that all those "something went wrong" things translated into this many reapeats of my one reply!<br />
 
Royce B. March 19, 2017
Have made these before and they are good but for a muffin w/ a little more substance, try the Almond Flour Buns ...... just almond flour or ground almonds, eggs, butter (YUM), baking powder and some Truvia or Stevia or Swerve. Mix, bake, enjoy ..... to make them in the shape my husband likes best, I use a cast iron drop biscuit pan (well buttered ~ again, yum). They are big enough to cut in half and toast and you don't need to butter them as they are chock full 1
 
Robin J. March 19, 2017
I just baked these. Pretty simple. I used a whisk attachment with an electric mixer to beat the egg whites as I'm not that good at beating egg whites stiff by hand. I also used a healthy pinch of sea salt for flavor. Mine held together very well - no crumbling problems mentioned in an earlier post. I sampled one with just a pat of butter and it was so light and airy! Yum! I think you could make this sweet or savory depending on what type of slider or open face creation you make with these fluffy things. Fun to make!
 
Linda March 19, 2017
The first time I made these I had problems. They stuck to my silicone mat. They stuck to the wire rack. They broke so easily when I picked them up that between the sticking problem and the breaking problem, I ended up with half crumbs and half rolls I could use.<br /><br />I ended up changing the recipe, adding butter, xanthan gum and guar gum. I also added a touch of swerve and stevia because they have no flavor to speak of. Blah. Boring. Dull. Personally I prefer my revised recipe, but I still wonder whether I'm the only person for whom the original recipe doesn't work very well.
 
Kt4 March 19, 2017
These things are awesome! I've made them a couple times and they are quite easy. Don't let separating eggs & whipping egg white deter you. They are actually quite sturdy as long as you don't over cook them, and they are better fresher.<br /><br />As for dairy-less cream cheese, maybe try a vegan version? A soft goat cheese would probably work, as long as it's not too dry & crumbly.
 
littlegypsyau March 19, 2017
What could I use instead of cheese please? No dairy for me
 
Jennifer S. March 19, 2017
Could they be made with goat cheese instead of cream cheese? I can tolerate goat but not cows milk. They look very interesting. Thanks!!
 
Jennifer S. March 19, 2017
Could they be made with goat cheese instead of cream cheese? I can tolerate goat but not cows milk. They look very interesting. Thanks!!
 
Melanie March 17, 2017
I have actually made these and sprinkled a bit of sesame or poppy seed on top for a "sandwich-like" quality works well!<br />
 
KyMorgan March 16, 2017
These look amazing!! Thanks so much for taking a deeper delve into my question!
 
Cat E. March 16, 2017
Can these be made in the microwave?
 
Author Comment
Sarah J. March 16, 2017
I don't think that would work (you won't get any crispiness—just fluff), but let me know if you try!