Quiche

A Cheesy, Creamy No-Fuss Quiche With an Unexpected (Gluten-Free!) Crust

Hint: It's not pastry!

January 24, 2019
Photo by Posie Brien

Winter is the season of comfort food. I say a silent hallelujah when the snow starts falling—ready to pull out my casserole dish and hunker down with favorite recipes. There are foods I crave during the coldest days: baked pastas covered in a gooey layer of cheese, slow-simmered soups laden with cream, and meaty stews redolent with spices and red wine.

But as much as these wintry dishes soothe and warm me, I also want to be nourished. Around this time of year, there’s a lot of chatter about refreshing and rebooting and stripping down our cooking. After the excesses of the holidays, we seem to want a break.

Luckily, there is an abundance of good territory between the two extremes: comforting food that fills you up but doesn’t weigh you down.

I’ve been keeping an eye out for creative and interesting uses of vegetables, sifting through the onslaught of New Year resolution-minded recipes to find little sparks of inspiration I could tailor to favorite winter meals.

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Top Comment:
“I didn't think the sweet potatoes were going to work for the crust because they shrunk so much after the first 20 min bake. I poured on the egg mixture anyway and after it baked up I got nice clean slices of quiche after all. I did change a few things. I used Monterey Jack for the cheese, 5 eggs total, and half and half for the milk and cream. Also, I only used half the amount of greens. Six ounces seemed like way too much. I did use mixed greens but I think I'd prefer just spinach next time. Thank you for the recipe!”
— Amy
Comment

Today’s recipe is a perfect marriage of all these elements, and a winning example of adding good things to your cooking instead of subtracting. You make a classic quiche filling—to which I’ve added whole-grain mustard, Gruyere, and mixed greens—and instead of pouring it into a basic pie crust, you use sweet potatoes.

The golden crust of my dreams. Photo by Posie Brien

Vegetables stepping in for a carb-y base isn't new (cauliflower pizza crust or zucchini noodles or potato avocado toasts are all over the place), so I took inspiration from this, thinking that mashing the sweet potato and mixing it with "riced" cauliflower and a bit of egg as binder would be the way to go. But making a crust with that method was too soft for my liking; I prefer simply slicing the sweet potatoes. Not only is the texture more crust-like, but it's an easier preparation which keeps this in simple weeknight dinner territory.

This technique yields both a good-looking and good-tasting quiche. I was skeptical of how the potatoes would hold up as a crust, but they do well. The key is to slice the potatoes thinly and uniformly, then to layer them with enough overlapping so your filling doesn’t leak. Bear in mind, it might leak because that’s life—but if it does, it will be minimal and the quiche will still be sliceable. (It’s happened to me a few times, and it wasn’t a noticeable issue, just slightly messier than when the filling stayed in place.)

The sweet potato softens nicely on the bottom, but the edges up top get crispy and golden, like potato chips, as it bakes. I loved the final effect and how the flavor of the sweet potato adds an earthiness to the dish.

Give it a shot, and if you like the technique, try using thinly sliced beets in addition to—or in place of—the sweet potatoes for a multicolored effect with a slightly sweeter flavor. I, for one, will be curled up under a blanket watching the snow fall and happily savoring a lighter taste of winter.

What's your favorite way to add vegetables to wintry comfort food? Share ideas in the comments section below!

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See what other Food52 readers are saying.

  • Sue
    Sue
  • Amy
    Amy
  • GastroHistory
    GastroHistory
  • Posie (Harwood) Brien
    Posie (Harwood) Brien
  • Alisha
    Alisha
Comment
I like warm homemade bread slathered with fresh raw milk butter, ice cream in all seasons, the smell of garlic in olive oil, and sugar snap peas fresh off the vine.

8 Comments

Sue January 26, 2019
This recipe looks great, I'm definitely going to try it out. I've just stumbled onto this website and loving what I see so far.
 
Amy January 25, 2019
I made this today and really enjoyed it! I didn't think the sweet potatoes were going to work for the crust because they shrunk so much after the first 20 min bake. I poured on the egg mixture anyway and after it baked up I got nice clean slices of quiche after all. I did change a few things. I used Monterey Jack for the cheese, 5 eggs total, and half and half for the milk and cream. Also, I only used half the amount of greens. Six ounces seemed like way too much. I did use mixed greens but I think I'd prefer just spinach next time. Thank you for the recipe!
 
Amy January 25, 2019
Also didn't have the whole grain mustard so I used Dijon.
 
Author Comment
Posie (. January 25, 2019
Awesome, glad you liked it! I felt the same way about the potatoes...I just did not believe it was going to work but then it did...thrilling! It's the little things :)
 
GastroHistory January 24, 2019
This recipe looks delicious, but a large proportion of those with coeliac disease are also lactose intolerant or cannot have dairy of any kind.
 
Alisha January 24, 2019
Then they don't have to put dairy in it?
 
Karen F. January 24, 2019
I was planning on doing this dairy free! Eggs with a neutral nut milk and cashew cheese. Sounds delicious with those sweet potatoes....
 
Jill F. January 27, 2019
than don't make it. my goodness, I know I should not read the comments!