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What is the best way to brine a turkey

asked by Mindfulivin almost 5 years ago

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8 answers 1597 views
5dd58b70 52d5 415a 8478 ba9053b33e62  kenzi
Kenzi Wilbur

Kenzi is the Managing Editor of Food52.

added almost 5 years ago

We have a lot of diehard dry-brining fans around here, and you can read why here:
http://www.food52.com/blog...

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8425a5f0 773c 4ccd b24e 9e75b44477a8  monita photo
Monita

Monita is a Recipe Tester for Food52

added almost 5 years ago

If you want to do a liquid brine, here's a good "how to"
http://www.marthastewart...

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Cfe06c3a 31ba 4cd7 a0b0 2d1e7eb98d8e  18930218514 6fcf35ff43 b
Lindsay-Jean Hard

Lindsay-Jean is a Contributing Writer & Editor at Food52.

added almost 5 years ago

My family's had success with the Pioneer Woman's Turkey Brine: http://thepioneerwoman...

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516f887e 3787 460a bf21 d20ef4195109  bigpan
added almost 5 years ago

Other than the recipes above, I suggest using a Coleman cooler. It is the right size, keeps the brine and bird at the right temperature.

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Wholefoods user icon
added almost 5 years ago

I agree with bigpan. If your going to brine the bird, (technique wise) doing it in the coleman's cooler is the way to go.

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Eed1fa70 e05b 43bb b687 bb2e48114f09  giphy
pierino

pierino is a trusted source on General Cooking and Tough Love.

added almost 5 years ago

I've come to take a contrarian view on brining. I use a wet brine but I inject it directly into the breast meat. An injector will cost you about $20. I started doing this with prime rib and moved onto large birds. You can get a nice crisp skin on the outside and tender flesh on the outside.

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3639eee1 5e0d 4861 b1ed 149bd0559f64  gator cake
hardlikearmour

hardlikearmour is a trusted home cook.

added almost 5 years ago

What is the injector composed of? If it's like a giant syringe with a big needle you could almost certainly find one at a feed store for far less.

Eed1fa70 e05b 43bb b687 bb2e48114f09  giphy
pierino

pierino is a trusted source on General Cooking and Tough Love.

added almost 5 years ago

It hadn't occurred to me to check a feed store, although there are certainly plenty around me. In any case you will need something with at least a 1 1/2 ounce liquid capacity.

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