How do I relise pressure from a pressure cooker

Mine does not have a relsie button or anything and it is making noise and I don't know what I am suppose to do.

  • 21067 views
  • 9 Comments

8 Comments

Review our Code of Conduct
Don't send me emails about new comments
Monita
Monita March 2, 2013

Go to the manufacturer's website and they will probably have guidance on how to release the pressure

Review our Code of Conduct
Don't send me emails about new comments
Matt Wheelock
Matt Wheelock March 2, 2013

thank you very much

Review our Code of Conduct
Don't send me emails about new comments
paseo
paseo March 2, 2013

Take it off the heat, put under cold water in the sink.

Review our Code of Conduct
Don't send me emails about new comments
WileyP
WileyP March 2, 2013

Paseo is right, running cold water over the pressure cooker will cool it off, thus releasing the pressure. Also, if your pressure control is a small pipe sticking out the top with a weighted round disc on it, simply remove the weight. When the hissing stops, the pressure should be gone. Simply waiting for the hissing to stop without removing the weight may not actually indicate that the pressure is completely released.
Oh, and you might want to consider painting your kitchen ceiling with a washable paint. One that tomato sauce will not stain!

Review our Code of Conduct
Don't send me emails about new comments
smslaw
smslaw March 4, 2013

"One that tomato sauce will not stain!"
Or grape jelly!

pierino
pierino March 2, 2013

It sort of depends on which model you have. Mine is Kuhn Rikuhn. There's a button top that rises gradually as pressure builds up. On this one you just tap down the button to release pressure. It's a good idea to hang on to the instructions, even if they are only on the outside of the box.

Review our Code of Conduct
Don't send me emails about new comments
petitbleu
petitbleu March 3, 2013

With our pressure cooker, if you're in the middle of the cooking process and it starts to vent, that means you need to turn the heat down. It shouldn't be hissing at you and should maintain pressure without venting. It's not something to be afraid of, but it is something to adjust for. We can often get away with setting our burner temp to medium-low (we have an electric range, so that might be something to consider as well) and still maintain pressure.
At the end of cooking when you want to release the pressure, the aforementioned method of putting it under cool running water is the quickest way to do so. Although you can also just take the pressure cooker off the heat and let it depressurize slowly (some argue that this is a better method for certain foods, but keep in mind that the food continues to cook for awhile with the slow-release method and so you may risk overcooking certain things--beans for instance). We do this when we make stock.

Review our Code of Conduct
Don't send me emails about new comments
mainecook61
mainecook61 March 3, 2013

Cooks Illustrated has a new and inexpensive book, called Pressure Cooker Perfection, coming out on March 15. (I have an advance review copy.) It has a lot of solid information on different types of pressure cookers, as well as the basics on how to use them and a good number of recipes. If you use the cooker a lot, or would like to, it might be a good investment.

Review our Code of Conduct
Don't send me emails about new comments
mainecook61
mainecook61 March 3, 2013

Cooks Illustrated has a new and inexpensive book, called Pressure Cooker Perfection, coming out on March 15. (I have an advance review copy.) It has a lot of solid information on different types of pressure cookers, as well as the basics on how to use them and a good number of recipes. If you use the cooker a lot, or would like to, it might be a good investment.

Review our Code of Conduct
Don't send me emails about new comments
Showing 8 out of 8 Comments Back to top
Recommended by Food52