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Is it possible to skin dry beans?

Weird question, I know.

I have these dry beans that have the most horrible skin on them but are otherwise delicious. Any method for getting the skin off before I cook them?

trampledbygeese is a trusted home cook.

asked almost 2 years ago
14 answers 813 views
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added almost 2 years ago

TBG: You might try cooking them with baking soda a la Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi's recipe for ultra-smooth hummus (1 tsp. baking soda to 1.5 cups of pre-soaked beans). The garbanzo skins floated to the top of the pot as they cooked and were easy to skim off and discard. P.S. There are no weird questions here.

8bbce907 3b5e 4c8c be5c c64e6c780d63  birthday 2012
luvcookbooks

Meg is a trusted home cook.

added almost 2 years ago

I have removed the skin from chickpeas for a Melissa Clark hummus recipe but sadly, to my palate, couldn't tell the difference. Skinned after cooking. Arduous, did it w my daughter.

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Susan W

Susan W is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added almost 2 years ago

There are tricks to remove skins after soaking and during cooking. Is there a reason you want to remove them before soak/cook?

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trampledbygeese

trampledbygeese is a trusted home cook.

added almost 2 years ago

I found the bean in the back of the cupboard. They may have been there five years, perhaps quite a bit longer. I know, I know, one shouldn't eat really old stuff from the back of the pantry, but they smelled okay so I cooked up a handful. The inside of the bean tasted fantastic! Perfect texture, not too sweet, not too bitter. Really nice.

But the skin was terribly tough and bitter. Inedible.

Germination test was poor, so I won't be growing these in the garden. Since I can't stand the idea of tossing food out, not if there is some hope of salvaging it, I figured why not ask how to skin them.

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trampledbygeese

trampledbygeese is a trusted home cook.

added almost 2 years ago

Also I dried a huge batch of scarlet runner beans this year, but they also have that nasty taste in the skin when I cook them. Tasty innards though.

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Susan W

Susan W is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added almost 2 years ago

I think you'll have an easier time removing the skins during cooking. I find the skins remove easily when I sprout my beans. I wasn't purposely removing the skins, but I do when they peel off while cooking them. I've been buying very fresh beans lately.

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 2 years ago

Dried beans are usually just fine if they're old. But they do need to cook longer. You didn't say what kind of bean. I've cooked older French green lentils and they were delicious, but needed half as long again before they were tender.

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trampledbygeese

trampledbygeese is a trusted home cook.

added almost 2 years ago

They are sort of a dusty rose colour bean. I don't know what kind, but it's a kind they don't seem to sell in local shops anymore.

Actually, it's weird. These days it's a challenge to find any dry beans that aren't chickpeas, lentils or an already mixed packet of beans and spices. Five years ago, I remember the big grocery store chain had a huge display of a dozen or more kinds of dry beans, but now it's all canned food and boxed pre-fab, add water and microwave, food-like products. Grocery chains apparently don't like dry beans anymore, but thankfully we have small mom and pop grocery shops lovingly stocked with all manner of dry beans. Amazing, even big box grocery is encouraging me to buy local or grow my own... who would have thunk it?

I guess the point of that long rant was that I can't find any beans that look like the ones I found when organizing the pantry, so I haven't a clue what they might be.

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 2 years ago

Hmmm. Thought I answered but it didn't go through. Google images of cranberry beans. Is that it?!

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 2 years ago

Check out the Rancho Gordo website to see if you can find the bean there - it's hard to say what kind it might be, there are so many that look somewhat alike. RG's beans are AMAZING, by the way, not cheap but IMO well worth the price. I've been ordering from them for years.

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Susan W

Susan W is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added almost 2 years ago

I love Rancho Gordo beans. We're lucky enough here in Portland that a few markets carry them. My favorites are the Yellow Indian Woman and the pink Rosa beans.

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trampledbygeese

trampledbygeese is a trusted home cook.

added almost 2 years ago

Wow, Rancho Gordo looks amazing. Great to see so many heritage varieties available for cooking.

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 2 years ago

You might find your mystery bean here: http://www.seedsavers.org along with lots of other heirloom beans and vegetables.

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trampledbygeese

trampledbygeese is a trusted home cook.

added almost 2 years ago

I love those guys.

I'm pretty certain these are romano beans, or a variation there upon. They can't be something too exhotic as they came from big box grocery before it was popular locally to sell more than one or two kinds of beans.

I wonder if I blanch them like almonds, if that would be the best way to get the skin off.