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Hi there. I am about to venture into a Julia Child recipe which calls for a 9 inch fire-proof casserole. I have a large Le Creuset an All-Clad Non-stick and a Lodge cast iron Dutch oven. Which can I use?

asked by XXX-XXX-6138 almost 6 years ago
14 answers 4050 views
23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 6 years ago

Not sure why you would need fire proof unless your going to cook with a wood fire.
But if this is the case then I wouldn't use either of the posted option. Black cast iron would be my only choice. Your Le creuset could have trouble with the enamel popping off at too high a heat and your non-stick has even lower heat tolerance. But if your just roasting in the oven or going from a burner to the oven then the le creuset would be my choice.

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 6 years ago

thanks for the response - I should have noted that the recipe requires that you literally "light the dish on fire" after the cognac is stirred in....??????

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 6 years ago

Well, doing this is a great technique although I've done this more time than I can remember I have never done this with non-stick. Le Creuset. I hope you have good venting with the fan on. The flame and heat should only be momentary.

401c5804 f611 451f a157 c693981d8eef  mad cow deux
pierino

pierino is a trusted source on General Cooking and Tough Love.

added almost 6 years ago

Stay away from non-stick for anything that requires igniting flames. The Le Creuset will work. And as my pal ChefDaddy advises, be sure you have a fan. Indeed the cognac burns off really fast and the flavor is subtle. In old school restaurants this was often done table side by the server or the front of the house guy.

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 6 years ago

I think by "fire proof" she (Julia) means "something that won't melt". I'm pretty sure you can flamber (the technique in question) in just about anything that you'd normally cook in, but don't try it in say a non-Pyrex glass bowl or a salad bowl or something.
It's a weird way to say it, but I think that is what she means to imply.

If you're non-stick has Teflon, be careful how hot you get it as it isn't meant for high-heat cooking (something about poisons leaching into the food).

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 6 years ago

Pierino just reminded me of the many catastraphe's I have seen in my day for table side flambe. Besides frightened customers there hve also been burnt cieling tiles, table cloths, and singed hair and clothes as well as the fire department showing up during a 300+ cover saturday night. Woo hoo! You always send out the new guy and never the experienced.

84baef1b 1614 4c3d a895 e859c9d40bd1  chris in oslo
Greenstuff

Chris is a trusted source on General Cooking

added almost 6 years ago

ChefDaddy, you are a hoot!! As for non-stick coatings, particularly the older ones, I think the concern is more that at high temperatures, they could be volatilized and you could breathe them. The concerns have grown because found in the blood, and we don't really know what their effects might be.

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 6 years ago

Sort of off topic, but ChefDaddy's experiences reminded me of an essential flamber guideline...never pour the liquor into the pan directly from the bottle. Always measure into a separate vessel first.
If you neglect this guideline...see ChefDaddy's post above. :-/

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 6 years ago

Ok, now you all have me a bit nervous, but I am doing this "Coq au Vin"! That being said, is my ventilation fan what you are saying I need - check. What purpose will this serve if not just to help with smoke, I presume. Will the flames be high? Do I need to have my husband ready with a fire extinguisher - cuz I can do that...wish me luck =)

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 6 years ago

I doubt the flames will be to high but there will be a rush of hot air momentarily. Just to exaust the hot air and give the flames a direction to go. Don't be afraid, just turn your fan on ignite the cognac and stand back until flames subside. Have fun!

401c5804 f611 451f a157 c693981d8eef  mad cow deux
pierino

pierino is a trusted source on General Cooking and Tough Love.

added almost 6 years ago

This IS fun! As you've been instructed measure out your cognac and don't do the Rachael Ray thing (a couple of "glugs"). The technique is actually pretty simple; you tip your pan toward the flame and the alcohol vapor will set in on fire. Don't use a match unless you happen to like the taste of sulphur bits.

84baef1b 1614 4c3d a895 e859c9d40bd1  chris in oslo
Greenstuff

Chris is a trusted source on General Cooking

added almost 6 years ago

Don't worry, pollygirl. If you check my profile, you'll see that I do not have a range hood. While it keeps me from undertaking a lot of smoky techniques and makes dinner odors linger, I don't hesitate to light a little alcohol on fire. Go ahead, and blast away! Just do take Fantastic Mr. Fox's advice, and never pour from the bottle.

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 6 years ago

never from the bottle and, though this seems obvious, don't lean over the pan while you light it...

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 6 years ago

One time at band camp...

I did a steak Diane once and the flames caught the oil soaked vent hood above and we had a fire. Clean your vents once in awhile.