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Herbs: Dried vs Fresh (and how much to use)...in this case it's Mint

If I have a recipe that calls for dried mint, but want the option to use fresh instead. I looked it up elsewhere online and the source said that with herbs, you should use 3 times the amount of fresh for the amount of dried, but that with mint, the dried and fresh amounts should be equal. Thoughts? Opinions? Let me know what you think! Thanks!

asked by elizabeth c over 5 years ago
11 answers 28543 views
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Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

added over 5 years ago

I use 2 times the amount of fresh for the amount of dried for all herbs -- even with mint. I don't think fresh mint is any more potent than other fresh herbs.

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added over 5 years ago

I'd tend to use the larger amount of fresh. What are you making? I feel I just went through this but I can't recall what I was making.

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AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added over 5 years ago

Make sure you remove the stems as well as the end of each leaf that attaches to the stem, when chopping the mint, as they can be bitter (assuming of course you don't want that bitterness). ;o)

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added over 5 years ago

I recently made this food52 recipe, http://www.food52.com/recipes... called for dried mint and I subbed fresh mint. I doubled the amount and thought that that proportion worked well.

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pierino

pierino is a trusted source on General Cooking and Tough Love.

added over 5 years ago

Dried mint tastes like dust to me. I would definitely use fresh, but of course taste as you go.

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added over 5 years ago

Fresh mint is always best! I normally use double the amount of fresh as dried, but even using 3 times as much won't matter- probably just make it better :)

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added over 5 years ago

Great thanks so much for all of guidance!

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cc
added 3 months ago

To Pierino - Who said that dried mint tasted like dust. You MUST try Penzey's Spices! What you get at the grocery store tastes old by comparison. For example: The first time I used Penzey's granulated garlic I used the same amount I normally used and I had to toss what I made and start over. It was so fresh and sharp you only need a little. Moral of the story used less of Penzey's spices and taste often as you cook.

C8ffa92e 3766 46b4 8290 dbef5c382a03  james joyce 1
pierino

pierino is a trusted source on General Cooking and Tough Love.

added 3 months ago

I do buy dried herbs from Penzey's but mint is not an herb that survives drying with anything like its true flavor intact.

B3038408 42c1 4c18 b002 8441bee13ed3  new years kitchen hlc only
AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added 3 months ago

pierino, I agree, but here's something to keep in mind. Some Middle Eastern recipes actually call for dried mint, as it has a unique taste considered better for certain dishes. E.g., http://www.maureenabood...
The only dried mint I ever use is that which I've dried in the microwave. Remove the leaves from the stems, layer between paper towels, run at 75% power at 20 second intervals, stopping when the leaves are dry but not yet turning brown. They have quite a bit of flavor.
I use the same method when I trim back my marjoram plant. I put the long sprangly sprigs in the microwave, stripping the leaves off quickly once dry.
Microwave drying takes only a couple of minutes - one of those lovely short tasks to sandwich between others, during the short periods of down-time, or even while waiting for one's tea kettle to sing. ;o)

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added 3 months ago

Herbs are a fine example of Vonnegut's concept of the "granfaloon"- things that seem to be related but aren't. In particular, soft herbs (which are mostly annual, biennial or, like mint and tarragon, herbaceous perennials) do not behave anything like the oil laden shrubby perennials like thyme, rosemary, etc. when dried- most (or all) of them dry badly. As a rule, generalizations about herbs are pretty misleading- it just includes too large and varied a group of substances.