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Traveling to Paris with Peanut and tree nut allergies. Whee Can I buy bread that is safe and chocolate?

Also the airline will not provide a safe meal...What should I pack? Any advice would be so appreciated. S.

asked by sile 2 months ago

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12 answers 265 views
sile
added 2 months ago

NO one? Please help.

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Pete PedanticPete Bowcott
added 2 months ago

This is old but as you sound frustrated ...
https://www.tripadvisor...

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ChefJune
ChefJune

June is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added 2 months ago

Sorry. I haven't been around lately.
I think you will have to ask at each bakery or chocolatier. I know that doesn't sound very promising, and I'm sorry.

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sile
added 2 months ago

Thank you for your time.

ChefJune
ChefJune

June is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added 2 months ago

For your trip I would pack both dinner and breakfast. Take what you like, but don't take anything that is smelly (fish) or perishable. I'd take a sandwich (or two) for dinner. It's a long flight. I usually pack the lettuce, etc. Separately from the bread and meat so it won't get soggy. Hard boiled eggs are easy to carry for breakfast, along with a piece of firm fruit such as an apple or a banana.

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sile
added 2 months ago

that was very helpful. Many thanks

cv
cv
added 2 months ago

Fish isn't smelly unless it isn't fresh.

Note that the Japanese have been selling to-go lunches at train stations with fish for decades, the famous "eki-ben". Also, if you go to the food basement of a major Japanese department store, there will be tons of to-go items with fish. Again, not smelly at all.

The "smelly" reputation of fish is a falsehood provided you are buying, cooking, and eating high quality fresh fish or products made from such fish.

Just pack a sack lunch like you might take to the office, beach, or ballpark.

As for allergen labelling, the EU is more progressive than the USA on such matters:

https://ec.europa.eu/food...

You are looking for code H (nuts) on prepacked food:

https://menutech.com/en...

Many restaurants also have allergen codes on the food menus.

That said, it would be highly advisable for you to bring small cards that state your allergy and your preference is being shown safe items. Get this translated into French (have a French speaker verify the translation) and keep at few in your wallet every day. This will streamline communications and minimize the risk of being misunderstood.

It can be done and many with dietary restrictions have traveled abroad for centuries.

Best of luck.

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sile
added 2 months ago

So many thanks. The links were very helpful!

lloreen
added 2 months ago

Honestly, I am not sure that you will find a bakery that is 100% free of nuts in France. Peanuts are not commonly used, so that is no problem, but there will be almonds in some pastries. There is always a risk of cross contamination if the bakery uses almonds in some products. You can find bread that has no nuts in any bakery, but if your allergy is so strong that it will be set off by the presence of nuts in the same bakery, you should exercise caution. Better safe than sorry if this is a serious allergy. There are many things to enjoy about France - cheese, for example! If you don't speak French, print out a clear explanation (in French) that you have a severe nut allergy. You can hand that to the waiter.

For the airplane, I recommend fruit, cheese and crackers, a veggie wrap, or anything else that is easy to carry. You just can't have liquids. Here are some great suggestions from Heidi Swanson about what she packs for flight:
https://www.101cookbooks...

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cv
cv
added 2 months ago

There is no law about carrying liquids on board an airplane. You simply cannot carry them through security. Nothing prevents you from purchasing and carrying aboard beverages from terminal shops post-security. You can also fill up empty receptacles from water fountains.

It is easier today being an international traveler with dietary restrictions than any other moment in history.

It is way better than just 20-30 years ago.

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lloreen
added 2 months ago

Of course, CV. I meant that in terms of packing meals, you shouldn't bring liquids or semi-liquids from home. Even things like apple sauce that aren't really liquids might be confiscated. It's often up to the whim of the security agents. Better to bring salads pre-dressed etc..

cv
cv
added 2 months ago

The TSA regulation states that containers holding liquids must be less than 100ml (3.4 fluid ounces).

That's actually a huge amount of salad dressing. The salad dressing containers used in business and first class onboard meals are usually around 0.6-0.75 fluid ounces. Carrying through small containers of liquids (hand lotion, eye drops, mouthwash etc.) is not a problem.

Again, it pays to understand the TSA regulations and have packaging that clearly states the volume.

I can't remember the last time I had a single serving salad that used 100 ml of dressing. That's nearly a half a cup of dressing.

Yuck.