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Your Favorite Savory Breakfasts from Around the World

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There are so many great conversations on the Hotline—it's hard to choose a favorite. But we'll be doing it, once a week, to spread the wealth of our community's knowledge—and to keep the conversation going.

Today: Your favorite breakfasts from around the world—no passport required.


Toast slathered with butter and jam, granola atop yogurt, peanut butter eaten by the spoonful straight from the jar: We all have our breakfast routines. Not to say other meals aren't important (because, oh, they are), but breakfast is the first thing you eat. It holds a special place in our hearts and stomachs. Just like you probably don't eat the same thing for lunch and dinner every day, the same should be said for breakfast. Routines are great, but so is breaking out of banality.

Over on the Hotline, lloreen wants breakfast inspiration of the savory, global persuasion. "This morning I had vegetable soup, which was delicious and reminded me or eating pho in Vietnam," she writes and asks Food52ers for other favorite breakfasts when traveling abroad. The best part, though, is most everything's easy enough to make at home—sans passport, airplane, or baggage claim. From dosas to shakshuka, here are your favorite around-the-world breakfasts: 


  • Preena Chauhan, author of Healthy Gourmet Indian Cooking, says, “you will HAVE TO try masala dosas—rice pancakes topped with sambar (a spicy lentil soup), fresh coconut, curry leaves, and cilantro." She also recommends uttapam, which are easier to make at home.
  • Claire Smith says the full English breakfast (bacon, sausages, eggs, fried toast, fried mushrooms, fried tomatoes, and baked beans) is her favorite.
  • Trena Heinrich suggests char kway teow (a Malaysian stir-fried noodle dish) and roti canai (an Indian-inspired flatbread).


  • Creamtea suggests shakshuka (,eggs poached in a sauce of tomatoes and peppers).
  • In the same tomato-egg vein, Jessicamclement adores the Turkish dish menemen.
  • ChefJune makes extra kreplach (a type of dumpling akin to ravioli or Chinese wontons) so she can have leftovers for breakfast.

Have a favorite global breakfast? Tell us in the comments below! 

Tags: your burning questions, breakfast, global eats