Corn

14 Recipes For Corn Off the Cob

There's little more indicative of summer than eating corn off the cob, a messy, handheld operation that hopefully takes place outdoors, and hopefully with alternating sips of beer. But when you're hoping to keep your face clean (there are guests, after all) and eat from a bowl instead of out of your hands, just shave off those kernels and add them to anything from pasta and salad to baked goods and soup, and even ice cream, like below:

What're you cooking up with corn at the height of summer? Tell us in the comments below!

6 Comments

Vivienne July 24, 2016
OXO has a corn "zipper" that looks a lot like a computer mouse. Makes taking corn off the cob so easy. I can do a dozen in about 10 minutes once the husks are off. I've bought at least 5 for friends. Very little mess if you use a bowl with it.
 
Anne July 24, 2016
Iowa corn salad, using our two best crops -- corn and pork: 8 ears of grilled sweet corn, cut off the cob, and combined with 1-2 cups of diced cooked ham or bacon (or both!) and 1/4 cup of minced red onion or scallions. Whip up a quick dijon mustard-based vinaigrette, combine everything together, and let sit for at least an hour in the refrigerator. A great summer side dish for picnics, potlucks, etc.
 
Jennifer July 15, 2016
Grilled corn: finely chop some onions; peppers if you have 'em, sweet or hot; maybe a tomato; salt, pepper; toss with corn and a tab of butter; a few leaves of basil or any of other herb that's good with corn; make foil packets and grill, preferably over an open fire. In terms of making a mess getting the corn off the cob--I'm an Olympic level slob, but never make a mess with corn; just scrape it into a bowl.
 
Smaug July 15, 2016
It's not the kitchen you make a mess of, it's the corn.
 
Lynn July 15, 2016
That tomato, corn and garlic pasta is pretty much heaven on earth. :-)
 
Smaug July 15, 2016
For years I heard about cutting corn off of cobs, and wondered how you did it without making a mess-instructions given tending to gloss over the details. Finally, I went through a (brief) period of watching TV chefs, and found that they were doing it exactly the same way- ie, making a pig's breakfast of it. I've seen a few devices online, and bought a little doodad with a curved blade that helps a little, but bottom line- you're better off buying frozen. Not only is it much neater and more convenient, it's always available, you have control of quantities, and it keeps. Besides, even though a lot of corn is grown in my area, practically all you ever see on the cob is the insipid white stuff. Highly recommended, Trader Joes organic sweet corn.